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Title: Analysis of Hydrologic Time Series Reconstruction UncertaintyDue to Inverse Model InadequacyUsing the Laguerre Expansion Method

Abstract

This presentation describes some methods for modeling error in geophysical inverse problems.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1338783
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-20066
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; Earth Sciences; Mathematics

Citation Formats

He, Jiachuan, Hansen, Scott, and Vesselinov, Velimir Valentinov. Analysis of Hydrologic Time Series Reconstruction UncertaintyDue to Inverse Model InadequacyUsing the Laguerre Expansion Method. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1338783.
He, Jiachuan, Hansen, Scott, & Vesselinov, Velimir Valentinov. Analysis of Hydrologic Time Series Reconstruction UncertaintyDue to Inverse Model InadequacyUsing the Laguerre Expansion Method. United States. doi:10.2172/1338783.
He, Jiachuan, Hansen, Scott, and Vesselinov, Velimir Valentinov. Thu . "Analysis of Hydrologic Time Series Reconstruction UncertaintyDue to Inverse Model InadequacyUsing the Laguerre Expansion Method". United States. doi:10.2172/1338783. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1338783.
@article{osti_1338783,
title = {Analysis of Hydrologic Time Series Reconstruction UncertaintyDue to Inverse Model InadequacyUsing the Laguerre Expansion Method},
author = {He, Jiachuan and Hansen, Scott and Vesselinov, Velimir Valentinov},
abstractNote = {This presentation describes some methods for modeling error in geophysical inverse problems.},
doi = {10.2172/1338783},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Jan 05 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The principal subject of this report is the use of the Maximum Entropy method for spectral analysis of time series. The classical Fourier method is also discussed, mainly as a standard for comparison with the Maximum Entropy method. Examples are given which clearly demonstrate the superiority of the latter method over the former when the time series is short. The report also includes a chapter outlining the theory of the method, a discussion of the effects of noise in the data, a chapter on significance tests, a discussion of the problem of choosing the prediction filter length, and, most importantly,more » a description of a package of FORTRAN subroutines for making the various calculations. Cross-referenced program listings are given in the appendices. The report also includes a chapter demonstrating the use of the programs by means of an example. Real time series like the lynx data and sunspot numbers are also analyzed. 22 figures, 21 tables, 53 references.« less
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