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Title: The Global Ocean Data Analysis Project version 2 (GLODAPv2) – an internally consistent data product for the world ocean

Abstract

Version 2 of the Global Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAPv2) data product is composed of data from 724 scientific cruises covering the global ocean. It includes data assembled during the previous efforts GLODAPv1.1 (Global Ocean Data Analysis Project version 1.1) in 2004, CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic) in 2009/2010, and PACIFICA (PACIFic ocean Interior CArbon) in 2013, as well as data from an additional 168 cruises. Data for 12 core variables (salinity, oxygen, nitrate, silicate, phosphate, dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, and CCl 4) have been subjected to extensive quality control, including systematic evaluation of bias. The data are available in two formats: (i) as submitted but updated to WOCE exchange format and (ii) as a merged and internally consistent data product. In the latter, adjustments have been applied to remove significant biases, respecting occurrences of any known or likely time trends or variations. Adjustments applied by previous efforts were re-evaluated. Hence, GLODAPv2 is not a simple merging of previous products with some new data added but a unique, internally consistent data product. In conclusion, this compiled and adjusted data product is believed to be consistent to better than 0.005 in salinity, 1 % in oxygen,more » 2 % in nitrate, 2 % in silicate, 2 % in phosphate, 4 µmol kg -1 in dissolved inorganic carbon, 6 µmol kg -1 in total alkalinity, 0.005 in pH, and 5 % for the halogenated transient tracers.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [2];  [6];  [7];  [6];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [12];  [13];  [14]
  1. University of Bergen and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research (Norway)
  2. Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences
  3. Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ), Marine Geology and Chemical Oceanography (Netherlands)
  4. University of Bergen and Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research (Norway); Uni Research Climate, Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research (Norway)
  5. Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas – CSIC (Spain)
  6. GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel (Germany)
  7. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Environmental Sciences Division
  8. Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (Germany)
  9. IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute (Sweden)
  10. Univ. of Bremen (Germany). Inst. of Environmental Physics (IUP)
  11. Uni Research Climate, Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research (Norway)
  12. Meteorological Research Institute, Japan Meteorological Agency (Japan). Oceanography and Geochemistry Research Department
  13. Instituto de Investigaciones Marinas a CSIC (Spain)
  14. Marine Information Research Center, Japan Hydrographic Association (Japan)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1338547
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Earth System Science Data (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Earth System Science Data (Online); Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1866-3516
Publisher:
Copernicus
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 58 GEOSCIENCES; GLODAP; CARINA. PACIFICA

Citation Formats

Olsen, Are, Key, Robert M., van Heuven, Steven, Lauvset, Siv K., Velo, Anton, Lin, Xiaohua, Schirnick, Carsten, Kozyr, Alex, Tanhua, Toste, Hoppema, Mario, Jutterström, Sara, Steinfeldt, Reiner, Jeansson, Emil, Ishii, Masao, Pérez, Fiz F., and Suzuki, Toru. The Global Ocean Data Analysis Project version 2 (GLODAPv2) – an internally consistent data product for the world ocean. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.5194/essd-8-297-2016.
Olsen, Are, Key, Robert M., van Heuven, Steven, Lauvset, Siv K., Velo, Anton, Lin, Xiaohua, Schirnick, Carsten, Kozyr, Alex, Tanhua, Toste, Hoppema, Mario, Jutterström, Sara, Steinfeldt, Reiner, Jeansson, Emil, Ishii, Masao, Pérez, Fiz F., & Suzuki, Toru. The Global Ocean Data Analysis Project version 2 (GLODAPv2) – an internally consistent data product for the world ocean. United States. doi:10.5194/essd-8-297-2016.
Olsen, Are, Key, Robert M., van Heuven, Steven, Lauvset, Siv K., Velo, Anton, Lin, Xiaohua, Schirnick, Carsten, Kozyr, Alex, Tanhua, Toste, Hoppema, Mario, Jutterström, Sara, Steinfeldt, Reiner, Jeansson, Emil, Ishii, Masao, Pérez, Fiz F., and Suzuki, Toru. 2016. "The Global Ocean Data Analysis Project version 2 (GLODAPv2) – an internally consistent data product for the world ocean". United States. doi:10.5194/essd-8-297-2016. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1338547.
@article{osti_1338547,
title = {The Global Ocean Data Analysis Project version 2 (GLODAPv2) – an internally consistent data product for the world ocean},
author = {Olsen, Are and Key, Robert M. and van Heuven, Steven and Lauvset, Siv K. and Velo, Anton and Lin, Xiaohua and Schirnick, Carsten and Kozyr, Alex and Tanhua, Toste and Hoppema, Mario and Jutterström, Sara and Steinfeldt, Reiner and Jeansson, Emil and Ishii, Masao and Pérez, Fiz F. and Suzuki, Toru},
abstractNote = {Version 2 of the Global Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAPv2) data product is composed of data from 724 scientific cruises covering the global ocean. It includes data assembled during the previous efforts GLODAPv1.1 (Global Ocean Data Analysis Project version 1.1) in 2004, CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic) in 2009/2010, and PACIFICA (PACIFic ocean Interior CArbon) in 2013, as well as data from an additional 168 cruises. Data for 12 core variables (salinity, oxygen, nitrate, silicate, phosphate, dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, pH, CFC-11, CFC-12, CFC-113, and CCl4) have been subjected to extensive quality control, including systematic evaluation of bias. The data are available in two formats: (i) as submitted but updated to WOCE exchange format and (ii) as a merged and internally consistent data product. In the latter, adjustments have been applied to remove significant biases, respecting occurrences of any known or likely time trends or variations. Adjustments applied by previous efforts were re-evaluated. Hence, GLODAPv2 is not a simple merging of previous products with some new data added but a unique, internally consistent data product. In conclusion, this compiled and adjusted data product is believed to be consistent to better than 0.005 in salinity, 1 % in oxygen, 2 % in nitrate, 2 % in silicate, 2 % in phosphate, 4 µmol kg-1 in dissolved inorganic carbon, 6 µmol kg-1 in total alkalinity, 0.005 in pH, and 5 % for the halogenated transient tracers.},
doi = {10.5194/essd-8-297-2016},
journal = {Earth System Science Data (Online)},
number = 2,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

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Cited by: 9works
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