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Title: Reaction System Design for NO 2 Oxidation of Used Nuclear Fuel for the FY17 Hot Test

Abstract

A dry pretreatment process based on the oxidation of used nuclear fuel to convert it to a fine powder is being studied for the removal and capture of tritium and iodine before subsequent processing. The process converts oxide fuel into a fine powder at low temperature using NO 2/O 2 mixtures. The form of the powder product can be selected to be U 3O 8, UO 3, or a nitrate by adjusting the processing conditions. All the fundamental tenets of the process have been successfully demonstrated as a proof of principle, and many aspects have been corroborated multiple times at laboratory scale. The present thrust is to develop the process to a technology-readiness level sufficient to evaluate and estimate the cost of an engineering-scale implementation. A previous roadmap analysis of the implementation determined that the most desirable approach would be based on kilogram-scale experiments using real fuel in parallel with multi-kg testing of prototype systems using surrogate material. Following the planned approach, kilogram-scale experiments will be conducted in FY 2017. This report describes the primary reaction system designs and the equipment that has been fabricated. Details related to instrumentation, data acquisition, and controls have been previously reported.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1338534
Report Number(s):
ORNL/LTR-2016/355
AF5805010; NEAF327; TRN: US1701437
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; NITROGEN DIOXIDE; OXYGEN; SPENT FUELS; URANIUM OXIDES U3O8; URANIUM TRIOXIDE; OXIDATION; TRITIUM; IODINE; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0400-1000 K; DESIGN; POWDERS; PILOT PLANTS; IMPLEMENTATION; MIXTURES; NITRATES; CAPTURE; COST; EQUIPMENT; REMOVAL; TESTING

Citation Formats

Johnson, Jared A., and DelCul, Guillermo Daniel. Reaction System Design for NO2 Oxidation of Used Nuclear Fuel for the FY17 Hot Test. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1338534.
Johnson, Jared A., & DelCul, Guillermo Daniel. Reaction System Design for NO2 Oxidation of Used Nuclear Fuel for the FY17 Hot Test. United States. doi:10.2172/1338534.
Johnson, Jared A., and DelCul, Guillermo Daniel. 2016. "Reaction System Design for NO2 Oxidation of Used Nuclear Fuel for the FY17 Hot Test". United States. doi:10.2172/1338534. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1338534.
@article{osti_1338534,
title = {Reaction System Design for NO2 Oxidation of Used Nuclear Fuel for the FY17 Hot Test},
author = {Johnson, Jared A. and DelCul, Guillermo Daniel},
abstractNote = {A dry pretreatment process based on the oxidation of used nuclear fuel to convert it to a fine powder is being studied for the removal and capture of tritium and iodine before subsequent processing. The process converts oxide fuel into a fine powder at low temperature using NO2/O2 mixtures. The form of the powder product can be selected to be U3O8, UO3, or a nitrate by adjusting the processing conditions. All the fundamental tenets of the process have been successfully demonstrated as a proof of principle, and many aspects have been corroborated multiple times at laboratory scale. The present thrust is to develop the process to a technology-readiness level sufficient to evaluate and estimate the cost of an engineering-scale implementation. A previous roadmap analysis of the implementation determined that the most desirable approach would be based on kilogram-scale experiments using real fuel in parallel with multi-kg testing of prototype systems using surrogate material. Following the planned approach, kilogram-scale experiments will be conducted in FY 2017. This report describes the primary reaction system designs and the equipment that has been fabricated. Details related to instrumentation, data acquisition, and controls have been previously reported.},
doi = {10.2172/1338534},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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  • This report describes the design and operation and technical accomplishments of a spent-fuel oxidation test facility at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The objective of the experiments conducted in this facility was to develop a data base for determining spent-fuel dry storage temperature limits by characterizing the oxidation behavior of light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuels in air. These data are needed to support licensing of dry storage in air as an alternative to spent-fuel storage in water pools. They are to be used to develop and validate predictive models of spent-fuel behavior during dry air storage in an Independent Spent Fuelmore » Storage Installation (ISFSI). The present licensed alternative to pool storage of spent fuel is dry storage in an inert gas environment, which is called inerted dry storage (IDS). Licensed air storage, however, would not require monitoring for maintenance of an inert-gas environment (which IDS requires) but does require the development of allowable temperature limits below which UO/sub 2/ oxidation in breached fuel rods would not become a problem. Scoping tests at PNL with nonirradiated UO/sub 2/ pellets and spent-fuel fragment specimens identified the need for a statistically designed test matrix with test temperatures bounding anticipated maximum acceptable air-storage temperatures. This facility was designed and operated to satisfy that need. 7 refs.« less
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