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Title: Progress on Plant-Level Components for Nuclear Fuel Recycling: Commonality

Abstract

Progress made in developing a common mathematical modeling framework for plant-level components of a simulation toolkit for nuclear fuel recycling is summarized. This ongoing work is performed under the DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, which has an element focusing on safeguards and separations (SafeSeps). One goal of this element is to develop a modeling and simulation toolkit for used nuclear fuel recycling. The primary function of the SafeSeps simulation toolkit is to enable the time-dependent coupling of separation modules and safeguards tools (either native or third-party supplied) that simulate and/or monitor the individual separation processes in a separations plant. The toolkit integration environment will offer an interface for the modules to register in the toolkit domain based on the commonality of diverse unit operations. This report discusses the source of this commonality from a combined mathematical modeling and software design perspectives, and it defines the initial basic concepts needed for development of application modules and their integrated form, that is, an application software. A unifying mathematical theory of chemical thermomechanical network transport for physicochemical systems is proposed and outlined as the basis for developing advanced modules. A program for developing this theory from the underlying first-principlesmore » continuum thermomechanics will be needed in future developments; accomplishment of this task will enable the development of a modern modeling approach for plant-level models. Rigorous, advanced modeling approaches at the plant-level can only proceed from the development of reduced (or low-order) models based on a solid continuum field theory foundation. Such development will pave the way for future programmatic activities on software verification, simulation validation, and model uncertainty quantification on a scientific basis; currently, no satisfactory foundation exists for considering these activities. The exploitation of mathematical commonality for unit operations with the intent of developing generic and comprehensive software for nuclear reprocessing has not been considered to this author's knowledge. Past attention has been given to plant-level processes on an individual and isolated basis, which has led to various models and corresponding codes implementing non-systematic approaches based on elementary principles of chemical processing. This practice has built an initial knowledge base, but it was not fruitful in producing a lasting and extensible simulation capability. In contrast, a common, rigorous, mathematical modeling framework for all plant-level operations, as proposed here, has a tremendous practical and theoretical value because it will reduce the software implementation work, creates a well-defined modeling standard to compare past and future models, and, more importantly, opens the doors for scientific considerations of simulation fidelity; the latter has an obvious beneficial impact in supporting experimental validation programs. Therefore, the proposed framework is likely to generate a solid foundation for modeling plant-level processes for physicochemical nuclear (and non-nuclear) applications. Demonstration of concrete module implementation is the subject of future communications including prototypes for several modules, namely, voloxidation, dissolver, digester, accountability tank, and solvent extraction. Unit-operation commonality is a key aspect to be explored for a successful implementation of these modules aimed at realizing various flowsheets and plant configurations.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1338480
Report Number(s):
ORNL/LTR-2011/176
AF5831040; NEAF315; TRN: US1701433
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; NUCLEAR FUELS; SEPARATION PROCESSES; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; REPROCESSING; COMPUTER CODES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; SAFEGUARDS; DESIGN; STANDARDS; THERMODYNAMICS

Citation Formats

de Almeida, Valmor F. Progress on Plant-Level Components for Nuclear Fuel Recycling: Commonality. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.2172/1338480.
de Almeida, Valmor F. Progress on Plant-Level Components for Nuclear Fuel Recycling: Commonality. United States. doi:10.2172/1338480.
de Almeida, Valmor F. Mon . "Progress on Plant-Level Components for Nuclear Fuel Recycling: Commonality". United States. doi:10.2172/1338480. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1338480.
@article{osti_1338480,
title = {Progress on Plant-Level Components for Nuclear Fuel Recycling: Commonality},
author = {de Almeida, Valmor F.},
abstractNote = {Progress made in developing a common mathematical modeling framework for plant-level components of a simulation toolkit for nuclear fuel recycling is summarized. This ongoing work is performed under the DOE Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) program, which has an element focusing on safeguards and separations (SafeSeps). One goal of this element is to develop a modeling and simulation toolkit for used nuclear fuel recycling. The primary function of the SafeSeps simulation toolkit is to enable the time-dependent coupling of separation modules and safeguards tools (either native or third-party supplied) that simulate and/or monitor the individual separation processes in a separations plant. The toolkit integration environment will offer an interface for the modules to register in the toolkit domain based on the commonality of diverse unit operations. This report discusses the source of this commonality from a combined mathematical modeling and software design perspectives, and it defines the initial basic concepts needed for development of application modules and their integrated form, that is, an application software. A unifying mathematical theory of chemical thermomechanical network transport for physicochemical systems is proposed and outlined as the basis for developing advanced modules. A program for developing this theory from the underlying first-principles continuum thermomechanics will be needed in future developments; accomplishment of this task will enable the development of a modern modeling approach for plant-level models. Rigorous, advanced modeling approaches at the plant-level can only proceed from the development of reduced (or low-order) models based on a solid continuum field theory foundation. Such development will pave the way for future programmatic activities on software verification, simulation validation, and model uncertainty quantification on a scientific basis; currently, no satisfactory foundation exists for considering these activities. The exploitation of mathematical commonality for unit operations with the intent of developing generic and comprehensive software for nuclear reprocessing has not been considered to this author's knowledge. Past attention has been given to plant-level processes on an individual and isolated basis, which has led to various models and corresponding codes implementing non-systematic approaches based on elementary principles of chemical processing. This practice has built an initial knowledge base, but it was not fruitful in producing a lasting and extensible simulation capability. In contrast, a common, rigorous, mathematical modeling framework for all plant-level operations, as proposed here, has a tremendous practical and theoretical value because it will reduce the software implementation work, creates a well-defined modeling standard to compare past and future models, and, more importantly, opens the doors for scientific considerations of simulation fidelity; the latter has an obvious beneficial impact in supporting experimental validation programs. Therefore, the proposed framework is likely to generate a solid foundation for modeling plant-level processes for physicochemical nuclear (and non-nuclear) applications. Demonstration of concrete module implementation is the subject of future communications including prototypes for several modules, namely, voloxidation, dissolver, digester, accountability tank, and solvent extraction. Unit-operation commonality is a key aspect to be explored for a successful implementation of these modules aimed at realizing various flowsheets and plant configurations.},
doi = {10.2172/1338480},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {8}
}

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