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Title: Domain imaging in ferroelectric thin films via channeling-contrast backscattered electron microscopy

Abstract

We report that ferroelastic domain walls provide opportunities for deterministically controlling mechanical, optical, electrical, and thermal energy. Domain wall characterization in micro- and nanoscale systems, where their spacing may be of the order of 100 nm or less is presently limited to only a few techniques, such as piezoresponse force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These respective techniques cannot, however, independently characterize domain polarization orientation and domain wall motion in technologically relevant capacitor structures or in a non-destructive manner, thus presenting a limitation of their utility. In this work, we show how backscatter scanning electron microscopy utilizing channeling contrast yield can image the ferroelastic domain structure of ferroelectric films with domain wall spacing as narrow as 10 nm.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Electronic, Optical and Nano Materials Dept.
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Performance and Characterization Dept.
  3. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Microsystems Science and Technology Center
  4. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1338400
Report Number(s):
SAND-2016-12845J
Journal ID: ISSN 0022-2461; 650062
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; DMR-1508191
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Materials Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 52; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-2461
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Ihlefeld, Jon F., Michael, Joseph R., McKenzie, Bonnie B., Scrymgeour, David A., Maria, Jon-Paul, Paisley, Elizabeth A., and Kitahara, Andrew R. Domain imaging in ferroelectric thin films via channeling-contrast backscattered electron microscopy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1007/s10853-016-0402-x.
Ihlefeld, Jon F., Michael, Joseph R., McKenzie, Bonnie B., Scrymgeour, David A., Maria, Jon-Paul, Paisley, Elizabeth A., & Kitahara, Andrew R. Domain imaging in ferroelectric thin films via channeling-contrast backscattered electron microscopy. United States. doi:10.1007/s10853-016-0402-x.
Ihlefeld, Jon F., Michael, Joseph R., McKenzie, Bonnie B., Scrymgeour, David A., Maria, Jon-Paul, Paisley, Elizabeth A., and Kitahara, Andrew R. 2016. "Domain imaging in ferroelectric thin films via channeling-contrast backscattered electron microscopy". United States. doi:10.1007/s10853-016-0402-x. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1338400.
@article{osti_1338400,
title = {Domain imaging in ferroelectric thin films via channeling-contrast backscattered electron microscopy},
author = {Ihlefeld, Jon F. and Michael, Joseph R. and McKenzie, Bonnie B. and Scrymgeour, David A. and Maria, Jon-Paul and Paisley, Elizabeth A. and Kitahara, Andrew R.},
abstractNote = {We report that ferroelastic domain walls provide opportunities for deterministically controlling mechanical, optical, electrical, and thermal energy. Domain wall characterization in micro- and nanoscale systems, where their spacing may be of the order of 100 nm or less is presently limited to only a few techniques, such as piezoresponse force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. These respective techniques cannot, however, independently characterize domain polarization orientation and domain wall motion in technologically relevant capacitor structures or in a non-destructive manner, thus presenting a limitation of their utility. In this work, we show how backscatter scanning electron microscopy utilizing channeling contrast yield can image the ferroelastic domain structure of ferroelectric films with domain wall spacing as narrow as 10 nm.},
doi = {10.1007/s10853-016-0402-x},
journal = {Journal of Materials Science},
number = 2,
volume = 52,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
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