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Title: Final Techno-Economic Analysis of 550 MWe Supercritical PC Power Plant CO 2 Capture with Linde-BASF Advanced PCC Technology

Abstract

This topical report presents the techno-economic evaluation of a 550 MWe supercritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant utilizing Illinois No. 6 coal as fuel, integrated with 1) a previously presented (for a subcritical PC plant) Linde-BASF post-combustion CO 2 capture (PCC) plant incorporating BASF’s OASE® blue aqueous amine-based solvent (LB1) [Ref. 6] and 2) a new Linde-BASF PCC plant incorporating the same BASF OASE® blue solvent that features an advanced stripper interstage heater design (SIH) to optimize heat recovery in the PCC process. The process simulation and modeling for this report is performed using Aspen Plus V8.8. Technical information from the PCC plant is determined using BASF’s proprietary thermodynamic and process simulation models. The simulations developed and resulting cost estimates are first validated by reproducing the results of DOE/NETL Case 12 representing a 550 MWe supercritical PC-fired power plant with PCC incorporating a monoethanolamine (MEA) solvent as used in the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference [Ref. 2]. The results of the techno-economic assessment are shown comparing two specific options utilizing the BASF OASE® blue solvent technology (LB1 and SIH) to the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference. The results are shown comparing the energy demand for PCC, the incremental fuel requirement, and themore » net higher heating value (HHV) efficiency of the PC power plant integrated with the PCC plant. A comparison of the capital costs for each PCC plant configuration corresponding to a net 550 MWe power generation is also presented. Lastly, a cost of electricity (COE) and cost of CO 2 captured assessment is shown illustrating the substantial cost reductions achieved with the Linde-BASF PCC plant utilizing the advanced SIH configuration in combination with BASF’s OASE® blue solvent technology as compared to the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference. The key factors contributing to the reduction of COE and the cost of CO 2 captured, along with quantification of the magnitude of the reductions achieved by each of these factors, are also discussed. Additionally, a high-level techno-economic analysis of one more highly advanced Linde-BASF PCC configuration case (LB1-CREB) is also presented to demonstrate the significant impact of innovative PCC plant process design improvements on further reducing COE and cost of CO 2 captured for overall plant cost and performance comparison purposes. Overall, the net efficiency of the integrated 550 MWe supercritical PC power plant with CO 2 capture is increased from 28.4% with the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference to 30.9% with the Linde-BASF PCC plant previously presented utilizing the BASF OASE® blue solvent [Ref. 6], and is further increased to 31.4% using Linde-BASF PCC plant with BASF OASE® blue solvent and an advanced SIH configuration. The Linde-BASF PCC plant incorporating the BASF OASE® blue solvent also results in significantly lower overall capital costs, thereby reducing the COE and cost of CO 2 captured from $147.25/MWh and $56.49/MT CO 2, respectively, for the reference DOE/NETL Case 12 plant, to $128.49/MWh and $41.85/MT CO 2 for process case LB1, respectively, and $126.65/MWh and $40.66/MT CO 2 for process case SIH, respectively. With additional innovative Linde-BASF PCC process configuration improvements, the COE and cost of CO2 captured can be further reduced to $125.51/MWh and $39.90/MT CO 2 for LB1-CREB. Most notably, the Linde-BASF process options presented here have already demonstrated the potential to lower the cost of CO2 captured below the DOE target of $40/MT CO 2 at the 550 MWe scale for second generation PCC technologies.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Linde LLC, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)
  2. Linde AG Linde Engineering Division, Dresden (Germany)
  3. BASF Corporation, Houston, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Linde LLC, Murray Hill, NJ (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE), Clean Coal and Carbon (FE-20)
OSTI Identifier:
1338328
Report Number(s):
NA
DOE Contract Number:
FE0007453
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 42 ENGINEERING; Carbon Capture; post-combustion technology; advanced aqueous amine solvents; techno-economic assessment

Citation Formats

Bostick, Devin, Stoffregen, Torsten, and Rigby, Sean. Final Techno-Economic Analysis of 550 MWe Supercritical PC Power Plant CO2 Capture with Linde-BASF Advanced PCC Technology. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1338328.
Bostick, Devin, Stoffregen, Torsten, & Rigby, Sean. Final Techno-Economic Analysis of 550 MWe Supercritical PC Power Plant CO2 Capture with Linde-BASF Advanced PCC Technology. United States. doi:10.2172/1338328.
Bostick, Devin, Stoffregen, Torsten, and Rigby, Sean. Mon . "Final Techno-Economic Analysis of 550 MWe Supercritical PC Power Plant CO2 Capture with Linde-BASF Advanced PCC Technology". United States. doi:10.2172/1338328. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1338328.
@article{osti_1338328,
title = {Final Techno-Economic Analysis of 550 MWe Supercritical PC Power Plant CO2 Capture with Linde-BASF Advanced PCC Technology},
author = {Bostick, Devin and Stoffregen, Torsten and Rigby, Sean},
abstractNote = {This topical report presents the techno-economic evaluation of a 550 MWe supercritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant utilizing Illinois No. 6 coal as fuel, integrated with 1) a previously presented (for a subcritical PC plant) Linde-BASF post-combustion CO2 capture (PCC) plant incorporating BASF’s OASE® blue aqueous amine-based solvent (LB1) [Ref. 6] and 2) a new Linde-BASF PCC plant incorporating the same BASF OASE® blue solvent that features an advanced stripper interstage heater design (SIH) to optimize heat recovery in the PCC process. The process simulation and modeling for this report is performed using Aspen Plus V8.8. Technical information from the PCC plant is determined using BASF’s proprietary thermodynamic and process simulation models. The simulations developed and resulting cost estimates are first validated by reproducing the results of DOE/NETL Case 12 representing a 550 MWe supercritical PC-fired power plant with PCC incorporating a monoethanolamine (MEA) solvent as used in the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference [Ref. 2]. The results of the techno-economic assessment are shown comparing two specific options utilizing the BASF OASE® blue solvent technology (LB1 and SIH) to the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference. The results are shown comparing the energy demand for PCC, the incremental fuel requirement, and the net higher heating value (HHV) efficiency of the PC power plant integrated with the PCC plant. A comparison of the capital costs for each PCC plant configuration corresponding to a net 550 MWe power generation is also presented. Lastly, a cost of electricity (COE) and cost of CO2 captured assessment is shown illustrating the substantial cost reductions achieved with the Linde-BASF PCC plant utilizing the advanced SIH configuration in combination with BASF’s OASE® blue solvent technology as compared to the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference. The key factors contributing to the reduction of COE and the cost of CO2 captured, along with quantification of the magnitude of the reductions achieved by each of these factors, are also discussed. Additionally, a high-level techno-economic analysis of one more highly advanced Linde-BASF PCC configuration case (LB1-CREB) is also presented to demonstrate the significant impact of innovative PCC plant process design improvements on further reducing COE and cost of CO2 captured for overall plant cost and performance comparison purposes. Overall, the net efficiency of the integrated 550 MWe supercritical PC power plant with CO2 capture is increased from 28.4% with the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference to 30.9% with the Linde-BASF PCC plant previously presented utilizing the BASF OASE® blue solvent [Ref. 6], and is further increased to 31.4% using Linde-BASF PCC plant with BASF OASE® blue solvent and an advanced SIH configuration. The Linde-BASF PCC plant incorporating the BASF OASE® blue solvent also results in significantly lower overall capital costs, thereby reducing the COE and cost of CO2 captured from $147.25/MWh and $56.49/MT CO2, respectively, for the reference DOE/NETL Case 12 plant, to $128.49/MWh and $41.85/MT CO2 for process case LB1, respectively, and $126.65/MWh and $40.66/MT CO2 for process case SIH, respectively. With additional innovative Linde-BASF PCC process configuration improvements, the COE and cost of CO2 captured can be further reduced to $125.51/MWh and $39.90/MT CO2 for LB1-CREB. Most notably, the Linde-BASF process options presented here have already demonstrated the potential to lower the cost of CO2 captured below the DOE target of $40/MT CO2 at the 550 MWe scale for second generation PCC technologies.},
doi = {10.2172/1338328},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 09 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Jan 09 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The work summarized in this report is the first step towards a project that will re-train and create jobs for personnel in the coal industry and continue regional economic development to benefit regions impacted by previous downturns. The larger project is aimed at capturing ~300 tons/day (272 metric tonnes/day) CO 2 at a 90% capture rate from existing coal- fired boilers at the Abbott Power Plant on the campus of University of Illinois (UI). It will employ the Linde-BASF novel amine-based advanced CO 2 capture technology, which has already shown the potential to be cost-effective, energy efficient and compact atmore » the 0.5-1.5 MWe pilot scales. The overall objective of the project is to design and install a scaled-up system of nominal 15 MWe size, integrate it with the Abbott Power Plant flue gas, steam and other utility systems, and demonstrate the viability of continuous operation under realistic conditions with high efficiency and capacity. The project will also begin to build a workforce that understands how to operate and maintain the capture plants by including students from regional community colleges and universities in the operation and evaluation of the capture system. This project will also lay the groundwork for follow-on projects that pilot utilization of the captured CO 2 from coal-fired power plants. The net impact will be to demonstrate a replicable means to (1) use a standardized procedure to evaluate power plants for their ability to be retrofitted with a pilot capture unit; (2) design and construct reliable capture systems based on the Linde-BASF technology; (3) operate and maintain these systems; (4) implement training programs with local community colleges and universities to establish a workforce to operate and maintain the systems; and (5) prepare to evaluate at the large pilot scale level various methods to utilize the resulting captured CO 2. Towards the larger project goal, the UI-led team, together with Linde, has completed a preliminary design for the carbon capture pilot plant with basic engineering and cost estimates, established permitting needs, identified approaches to address Environmental, Health, and Safety concerns related to pilot plant installation and operation, developed approaches for long-term use of the captured carbon, and established strategies for workforce development and job creation that will re-train coal operators to operate carbon capture plants. This report describes Phase I accomplishments and demonstrates that the project team is well-prepared for full implementation of Phase 2, to design, build, and operate the carbon capture pilot plant.« less
  • This topical report presents the techno-economic analysis, conducted by Carbon Capture Scientific, LLC (CCS) and Nexant, for a nominal 550 MWe supercritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant utilizing CCS patented Gas Pressurized Stripping (GPS) technology for post-combustion carbon capture (PCC). Illinois No. 6 coal is used as fuel. Because of the difference in performance between the GPS-based PCC and the MEA-based CO2 absorption technology, the net power output of this plant is not exactly 550 MWe. DOE/NETL Case 11 supercritical PC plant without CO2 capture and Case 12 supercritical PC plant with benchmark MEA-based CO2 capture are chosen as references.more » In order to include CO2 compression process for the baseline case, CCS independently evaluated the generic 30 wt% MEA-based PCC process together with the CO2 compression section. The net power produced in the supercritical PC plant with GPS-based PCC is 647 MW, greater than the MEA-based design. The levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) over a 20-year period is adopted to assess techno-economic performance. The LCOE for the supercritical PC plant with GPS-based PCC, not considering CO2 transport, storage and monitoring (TS&M), is 97.4 mills/kWh, or 152% of the Case 11 supercritical PC plant without CO2 capture, equivalent to $39.6/tonne for the cost of CO2 capture. GPS-based PCC is also significantly superior to the generic MEA-based PCC with CO2 compression section, whose LCOE is as high as 109.6 mills/kWh.« less
  • Power plants burning fossil fuels are a major source of CO{sub 2} which is implicated in global warming. Microalgal systems which photosynthetically assimilate carbon dioxide can be used for mitigation of this major greenhouse gas. A techno-economic model was developed for trapping carbon dioxide from flue gases by microalgae in outdoor ponds. The model also shows that algal lipid content and growth rate are both important for an economical process, but a trade-off exists between the two, i.e., a high lipid content and low growth rate combination can be as effective as a low lipid content and high growth ratemore » combination. Hence, these two parameters may be treated as a composite parameter to be optimized to yield the least CO{sub 2} mitigation cost. Model predictions were also used to compare the microalgal technology with alternative technologies in terms of CO{sub 2} mitigation costs. Incorporating advances anticipated in the future into the design basis, the model yields a CO{sub 2} mitigation cost that is competitive with other CO{sub 2} remediation technologies currently being proposed. Furthermore, this technology also provides a lipid feedstock for producing a renewable fuel such as biodiesel. Deployment of this technology for CO{sub 2} mitigation looks attractive if research goals put forth by the model are achieved.« less
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