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Title: Means of introducing an analyte into liquid sampling atmospheric pressure glow discharge

Abstract

A liquid sampling, atmospheric pressure, glow discharge (LS-APGD) device as well as systems that incorporate the device and methods for using the device and systems are described. The LS-APGD includes a hollow capillary for delivering an electrolyte solution to a glow discharge space. The device also includes a counter electrode in the form of a second hollow capillary that can deliver the analyte into the glow discharge space. A voltage across the electrolyte solution and the counter electrode creates the microplasma within the glow discharge space that interacts with the analyte to move it to a higher energy state (vaporization, excitation, and/or ionization of the analyte).

Inventors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1338053
Patent Number(s):
9,536,725
Application Number:
14/171,981
Assignee:
Battelle Memorial Institute on behalf of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (Richland, WA) LBNL
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231; AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Patent File Date: 2014 Feb 04
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Marcus, R. Kenneth, Quarles, Jr., Charles Derrick, Russo, Richard E., Koppenaal, David W., Barinaga, Charles J., and Carado, Anthony J.. Means of introducing an analyte into liquid sampling atmospheric pressure glow discharge. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Marcus, R. Kenneth, Quarles, Jr., Charles Derrick, Russo, Richard E., Koppenaal, David W., Barinaga, Charles J., & Carado, Anthony J.. Means of introducing an analyte into liquid sampling atmospheric pressure glow discharge. United States.
Marcus, R. Kenneth, Quarles, Jr., Charles Derrick, Russo, Richard E., Koppenaal, David W., Barinaga, Charles J., and Carado, Anthony J.. Tue . "Means of introducing an analyte into liquid sampling atmospheric pressure glow discharge". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1338053.
@article{osti_1338053,
title = {Means of introducing an analyte into liquid sampling atmospheric pressure glow discharge},
author = {Marcus, R. Kenneth and Quarles, Jr., Charles Derrick and Russo, Richard E. and Koppenaal, David W. and Barinaga, Charles J. and Carado, Anthony J.},
abstractNote = {A liquid sampling, atmospheric pressure, glow discharge (LS-APGD) device as well as systems that incorporate the device and methods for using the device and systems are described. The LS-APGD includes a hollow capillary for delivering an electrolyte solution to a glow discharge space. The device also includes a counter electrode in the form of a second hollow capillary that can deliver the analyte into the glow discharge space. A voltage across the electrolyte solution and the counter electrode creates the microplasma within the glow discharge space that interacts with the analyte to move it to a higher energy state (vaporization, excitation, and/or ionization of the analyte).},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 03 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 03 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Patent:

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  • A new, low power ionization source for elemental MS analysis of aqueous solutions is described. The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LSAPGD) operates by a process wherein the surface of the liquid emanating from a 75 μm i.d. glass capillary acts as the cathode of the direct current glow discharge. Analytecontaining solutions at a flow rate of 100 μL min-1 are vaporized by the passage of current, yielding gas phase solutes that are subsequently ionized in the < 5 W (maximum of 60 mA and 500 V), ~1 mm3 volume, plasma. The LS-APGD is mounted in place of the normalmore » electrospray ionization source of a Thermo Scientific Exactive orbitrap mass spectrometer system. Basic operating characteristics are described, including the role of discharge power on mass spectral composition, the ability to obtain ultra-high resolution elemental isotopic patterns, and preliminary limits of detection attainable based on the injection of aliquots of multielement standards. While much optimization remains, it is believed that the LS-APGD may present a practical alternative to high-powered (>1 kW) plasma sources typically employed in elemental mass spectrometry, particularly for those cases where costs, operational overhead, and simplicity considerations are important.« less
  • A new, low power ionization source for the elemental analysis of aqueous solutions has recently been described. The liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) source operates at relatively low currents (<20 mA) and solution flow rates (<50 μL min-1), yielding a relatively simple alternative for atomic mass spectrometry applications. The LS-APGD has been interfaced to what is otherwise an organic, LC-MS mass analyzer, the Thermo Scientific Exactive Orbitrap without any modifications; other than removing the electrospray ionization (ESI) source supplied with that instrument. A glow discharge is initiated between the surface of the test solution exiting a glass capillary andmore » a metallic counter electrode mounted at a 90° angle and separated by a distance of ~5 mm. As with any plasma-based ionization source, there are key discharge operation and ion sampling parameters that affect the intensity and composition of the derived mass spectra; including signal-to-background ratios. We describe here a preliminary parametric evaluation of the roles of discharge current, solution flow rate, argon sheath gas flow rate, and ion sampling distance as they apply on this mass analyzer system. A cursive evaluation of potential matrix effects due to the presence of easily ionized elements (EIEs) indicate that sodium concentrations of up to 500 μg mL-1 generally cause suppressions of less than 50%, dependant upon the analyte species. Based on the results of this series of studies, preliminary limits of detection (LOD) have been established through the generation of calibration functions. Whilst solution-based concentrations LOD levels of 0.02 – 2 μg mL-1 3 are not impressive on the surface, the fact that they are determined via discrete 5 μL injections leads to mass-based detection limits at picogram to singlenanogram levels. The overhead costs associated with source operation (10 W d.c. power, solution flow rates of <50 μL min-1, and gas flow rates <10 mL min-1) are very attractive. While further optimization in the source design is suggested here, it is believed that the LS-APGD ion source may present a practical alternative to inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) sources typically employed in elemental mass spectrometry.« less
  • This work describes the use of a compact, liquid sampling – atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) ionization source to ionize metal particles within a laser ablation aerosol. Mass analysis was performed with a Thermo Scientific Exactive Mass Spectrometer which utilizes an orbitrap mass analyzer capable of producing mass resolution exceeding M/ΔM > 160,000. The LS-APGD source generates a low-power plasma between the surface of an electrolytic solution flowing at several µl min-1 through a fused silica capillary and a counter electrode consisting of a stainless steel capillary employed to deliver the laser ablation particles into the plasma. Sample particles ofmore » approximately 100 nm were generated with an Applied Spectra femtosecond laser located remotely and transported through 25 meters of polyurethane tubing by means of argon carrier gas. Samples consisted of an oxygen free copper shard, a disk of solder, and a one-cent U.S. coin. Analyte signal onset was readily detectable relative to the background signal produced by the carrier gas alone. The high mass resolution capability of the orbitrap mass spectrometer was demonstrated on the solder sample with resolution exceeding 90,000 for Pb and 160,000 for Cu. In addition, results from a laser ablation depth-profiling experiment of a one cent coin revealed retention of the relative locations of the ~10 µm copper cladding and zinc rich bulk layers.« less
  • ABSTRACT In order to meet a growing need for fieldable mass spectrometer systems for precise elemental and isotopic analyses, the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) has a number of very promising characteristics. One key set of attributes that await validation deals with the performance characteristics relative to isotope ratio precision and accuracy. Due to its availability and prior experience with this research team, the initial evaluation of isotope ratio (IR) performance was performed on a Thermo Scientific Exactive Orbitrap instrument. While the mass accuracy and resolution performance for orbitrap analyzers are very well documented, no detailed evaluations of themore » IR performance have been published. Efforts described here involve two variables: the inherent IR precision and accuracy delivered by the LSAPGD microplasma and the inherent IR measurement qualities of orbitrap analyzers. Important to the IR performance, the various operating parameters of the orbitrap sampling interface, HCD dissociation stage, and ion injection/data acquisition have been evaluated. The IR performance for a range of other elements, including natural, depleted, and enriched uranium isotopes was determined. In all cases the precision and accuracy are degraded when measuring low abundance (<0.1% isotope fractions). In the best case, IR precision on the order of 0.1 %RSD can be achieved, with values of 1-3 %RSD observed for low-abundance species. The results suggest that the LSAPGD is a very good candidate for field deployable MS analysis and that the high resolving powers of the orbitrap may be complemented with a here-to-fore unknown capacity to deliver high-precision isotope ratios.« less
  • Abstract The continued development of the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) microplasma as an ion source for diverse, elemental/isotopic analysis applications continues. To this end, characterization of the capabilities in performing precise and accurate isotope ratio (IR) determinations is essential. Based on past experience with the Thermo Exactive Orbitrap mass analyzer, the LS-APGD was interfaced with this instrument for these tests. While the Orbitrap platform has demonstrated excellent mass resolution and accuracy in “organic” mass spectrometry (MS) applications, work using an Orbitrap for IR analysis is very sparse. These efforts build off previous work in this coupling, where themore » importance of a few of the LS-APGD discharge parameters and Orbitrap data acquisition methods on IR precision and accuracy were probed. Presented here are the results of a study that evaluated the analytical precision for natural uranium sample (assumed 235U/238U = 0.0072) determinations. The instrumental parameters evaluated include the number of microscans and scans making up a data acquisition set, uranium concentration/signal level, sample make-up, and Fourier transform digitization window. Ultimately, a precision of 0.41% relative standard deviation (RSD) can be achieved for a single determination, with a reproducibility of 1.63 %RSD over 10 separate analytical measurements. A preliminary study of matrix effects on IR measurements of U is presented, highlighting the importance of pre-mass selection before injection into the Orbitrap. The analytical system sensitivity is suggested with the ability to produce a calibration function having an R2 value of >0.99 over a range of 4 orders of magnitude of concentration (~1 – 1000 ng mL-1). These efforts demonstrate the very promising pairing of the LS-APGD ionization source and the Orbitrap, pointing as well to definitive paths forward to better utilize both components in high quality isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS).« less