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Title: Exploring Asynchronous Many-Task Runtime Systems toward Extreme Scales

Abstract

Major exascale computing reports indicate a number of software challenges to meet the dramatic change of system architectures in near future. While several-orders-of-magnitude increase in parallelism is the most commonly cited of those, hurdles also include performance heterogeneity of compute nodes across the system, increased imbalance between computational capacity and I/O capabilities, frequent system interrupts, and complex hardware architectures. Asynchronous task-parallel programming models show a great promise in addressing these issues, but are not yet fully understood nor developed su ciently for computational science and engineering application codes. We address these knowledge gaps through quantitative and qualitative exploration of leading candidate solutions in the context of engineering applications at Sandia. In this poster, we evaluate MiniAero code ported to three leading candidate programming models (Charm++, Legion and UINTAH) to examine the feasibility of these models that permits insertion of new programming model elements into an existing code base.

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2];  [3];  [4];  [4]; ; ;  [4];
  1. O8953
  2. Rutgers U
  3. 08953
  4. SNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1337962
Report Number(s):
SAND2015-9155C
608020
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the SC15, the International Conference for High Performance Computing, Networking, Storage and Analysis held November 15-20, 2015 in Austin, TX, U.S.A..
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Knight, Samuel, Baker, Gavin Matthew, Gamell, Marc, Hollman, David, Sjaardema, Gregor, Kolla, Hemanth, Teranishi, Keita, Wilke, Jeremiah J, Slattengren, Nicole, and Bennett, Janine Camille. Exploring Asynchronous Many-Task Runtime Systems toward Extreme Scales. United States: N. p., 2015. Web.
Knight, Samuel, Baker, Gavin Matthew, Gamell, Marc, Hollman, David, Sjaardema, Gregor, Kolla, Hemanth, Teranishi, Keita, Wilke, Jeremiah J, Slattengren, Nicole, & Bennett, Janine Camille. Exploring Asynchronous Many-Task Runtime Systems toward Extreme Scales. United States.
Knight, Samuel, Baker, Gavin Matthew, Gamell, Marc, Hollman, David, Sjaardema, Gregor, Kolla, Hemanth, Teranishi, Keita, Wilke, Jeremiah J, Slattengren, Nicole, and Bennett, Janine Camille. Thu . "Exploring Asynchronous Many-Task Runtime Systems toward Extreme Scales". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1337962.
@article{osti_1337962,
title = {Exploring Asynchronous Many-Task Runtime Systems toward Extreme Scales},
author = {Knight, Samuel and Baker, Gavin Matthew and Gamell, Marc and Hollman, David and Sjaardema, Gregor and Kolla, Hemanth and Teranishi, Keita and Wilke, Jeremiah J and Slattengren, Nicole and Bennett, Janine Camille},
abstractNote = {Major exascale computing reports indicate a number of software challenges to meet the dramatic change of system architectures in near future. While several-orders-of-magnitude increase in parallelism is the most commonly cited of those, hurdles also include performance heterogeneity of compute nodes across the system, increased imbalance between computational capacity and I/O capabilities, frequent system interrupts, and complex hardware architectures. Asynchronous task-parallel programming models show a great promise in addressing these issues, but are not yet fully understood nor developed su ciently for computational science and engineering application codes. We address these knowledge gaps through quantitative and qualitative exploration of leading candidate solutions in the context of engineering applications at Sandia. In this poster, we evaluate MiniAero code ported to three leading candidate programming models (Charm++, Legion and UINTAH) to examine the feasibility of these models that permits insertion of new programming model elements into an existing code base.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {10}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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