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Title: A New Superalloy Enabling Heavy Duty Gas Turbine Wheels for Improved Combined Cycle Efficiency

Abstract

The drive to increase combined cycle turbine efficiency from 62% to 65% for the next-generation advanced cycle requires a new heavy duty gas turbine wheel material capable of operating at 1200°F and above. Current wheel materials are limited by the stability of their major strengthening phase (gamma double prime), which coarsens at temperatures approaching 1200°F, resulting in a substantial reduction in strength. More advanced gamma prime superalloys, such as those used in jet engine turbine disks, are also not suitable due to size constraints; the gamma prime phase overages during the slow cooling rates inherent in processing thick-section turbine wheels. The current program addresses this need by screening two new alloy design concepts. The first concept exploits a gamma prime/gamma double prime coprecipitation reaction. Through manipulation of alloy chemistry, coprecipitation is controlled such that gamma double prime is used only to slow the growth of gamma prime during slow cooling, preventing over-aging, and allowing for subsequent heat treatment to maximize strength. In parallel, phase field modeling provides fundamental understanding of the coprecipitation reaction. The second concept uses oxide dispersion strengthening to improve on two existing alloys that exhibit excellent hold time fatigue crack growth resistance, but have insufficient strength tomore » be considered for gas turbine wheels. Mechanical milling forces the dissolution of starting oxide powders into a metal matrix allowing for solid state precipitation of new, nanometer scale oxides that are effective at dispersion strengthening.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States). GE Global Research
  2. The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States). GE Global Research
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
Contributing Org.:
The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); General Electric Company, Niskayuna, NY (United States). GE Global Research
OSTI Identifier:
1337871
Report Number(s):
Final-Report
DOE Contract Number:
FE0026299
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING; gas turbine; wheel; gamma prime; gamma double prime; HIP; oxide dispersion strengthening; coprecipitation; phase field

Citation Formats

Detor, Andrew, DiDomizio, Richard, McAllister, Don, Sampson, Erica, Shi, Rongpei, and Zhou, Ning. A New Superalloy Enabling Heavy Duty Gas Turbine Wheels for Improved Combined Cycle Efficiency. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1337871.
Detor, Andrew, DiDomizio, Richard, McAllister, Don, Sampson, Erica, Shi, Rongpei, & Zhou, Ning. A New Superalloy Enabling Heavy Duty Gas Turbine Wheels for Improved Combined Cycle Efficiency. United States. doi:10.2172/1337871.
Detor, Andrew, DiDomizio, Richard, McAllister, Don, Sampson, Erica, Shi, Rongpei, and Zhou, Ning. Tue . "A New Superalloy Enabling Heavy Duty Gas Turbine Wheels for Improved Combined Cycle Efficiency". United States. doi:10.2172/1337871. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1337871.
@article{osti_1337871,
title = {A New Superalloy Enabling Heavy Duty Gas Turbine Wheels for Improved Combined Cycle Efficiency},
author = {Detor, Andrew and DiDomizio, Richard and McAllister, Don and Sampson, Erica and Shi, Rongpei and Zhou, Ning},
abstractNote = {The drive to increase combined cycle turbine efficiency from 62% to 65% for the next-generation advanced cycle requires a new heavy duty gas turbine wheel material capable of operating at 1200°F and above. Current wheel materials are limited by the stability of their major strengthening phase (gamma double prime), which coarsens at temperatures approaching 1200°F, resulting in a substantial reduction in strength. More advanced gamma prime superalloys, such as those used in jet engine turbine disks, are also not suitable due to size constraints; the gamma prime phase overages during the slow cooling rates inherent in processing thick-section turbine wheels. The current program addresses this need by screening two new alloy design concepts. The first concept exploits a gamma prime/gamma double prime coprecipitation reaction. Through manipulation of alloy chemistry, coprecipitation is controlled such that gamma double prime is used only to slow the growth of gamma prime during slow cooling, preventing over-aging, and allowing for subsequent heat treatment to maximize strength. In parallel, phase field modeling provides fundamental understanding of the coprecipitation reaction. The second concept uses oxide dispersion strengthening to improve on two existing alloys that exhibit excellent hold time fatigue crack growth resistance, but have insufficient strength to be considered for gas turbine wheels. Mechanical milling forces the dissolution of starting oxide powders into a metal matrix allowing for solid state precipitation of new, nanometer scale oxides that are effective at dispersion strengthening.},
doi = {10.2172/1337871},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 03 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 03 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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