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Title: Selective Area Epitaxy of GaAs Microstructures by Close-Spaced Vapor Transport for Solar Energy Conversion Applications

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [3];  [1]
  1. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403, United States
  2. Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon 97403, United States
  3. The Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, United States
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1337792
Grant/Contract Number:
EE0005957
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
ACS Energy Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: 2; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-07-15 09:25:15; Journal ID: ISSN 2380-8195
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Greenaway, Ann L., Sharps, Meredith C., Boucher, Jason W., Strange, Lyndi E., Kast, Matthew G., Aloni, Shaul, and Boettcher, Shannon W. Selective Area Epitaxy of GaAs Microstructures by Close-Spaced Vapor Transport for Solar Energy Conversion Applications. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.6b00217.
Greenaway, Ann L., Sharps, Meredith C., Boucher, Jason W., Strange, Lyndi E., Kast, Matthew G., Aloni, Shaul, & Boettcher, Shannon W. Selective Area Epitaxy of GaAs Microstructures by Close-Spaced Vapor Transport for Solar Energy Conversion Applications. United States. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.6b00217.
Greenaway, Ann L., Sharps, Meredith C., Boucher, Jason W., Strange, Lyndi E., Kast, Matthew G., Aloni, Shaul, and Boettcher, Shannon W. 2016. "Selective Area Epitaxy of GaAs Microstructures by Close-Spaced Vapor Transport for Solar Energy Conversion Applications". United States. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.6b00217.
@article{osti_1337792,
title = {Selective Area Epitaxy of GaAs Microstructures by Close-Spaced Vapor Transport for Solar Energy Conversion Applications},
author = {Greenaway, Ann L. and Sharps, Meredith C. and Boucher, Jason W. and Strange, Lyndi E. and Kast, Matthew G. and Aloni, Shaul and Boettcher, Shannon W.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acsenergylett.6b00217},
journal = {ACS Energy Letters},
number = 2,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1021/acsenergylett.6b00217

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • The high balance-of-system costs of photovoltaic (PV) installations indicate that reductions in cell $/W costs alone are likely insufficient for PV electricity to reach grid parity unless energy conversion efficiency is also increased. Technologies which yield both high-efficiency cells (>25%) and maintain low costs are needed. GaAs and related III-V semiconductors are used in the highest-efficiency single- and multi-junction photovoltaics, but the technology is too expensive for non-concentrated terrestrial applications. This is due in part to the difficulty of scaling the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process, which relies on expensive reactors and employs toxic and pyrophoric gas-phase precursors suchmore » as arsine and trimethyl gallium, respectively. In this study, we describe GaAs films made by an alternative close-spaced vapor transport (CSVT) technique which is carried out at atmospheric pressure and requires only bulk GaAs, water vapor, and a temperature gradient in order to deposit crystalline films with similar electronic properties to that of GaAs deposited by MOCVD. CSVT is similar to the vapor transport process used to deposit CdTe thin films and is thus a potentially scalable low-cost route to GaAs thin films.« less
  • The high balance-of-system costs of photovoltaic (PV) installations indicate that reductions in cell $/W costs alone are likely insufficient for PV electricity to reach grid parity unless energy conversion efficiency is also increased. Technologies which yield both high-efficiency cells (>25%) and maintain low costs are needed. GaAs and related III-V semiconductors are used in the highest-efficiency single- and multi-junction photovoltaics, but the technology is too expensive for non-concentrated terrestrial applications. This is due in part to the difficulty of scaling the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) process, which relies on expensive reactors and employs toxic and pyrophoric gas-phase precursors suchmore » as arsine and trimethyl gallium, respectively. In this study, we describe GaAs films made by an alternative close-spaced vapor transport (CSVT) technique which is carried out at atmospheric pressure and requires only bulk GaAs, water vapor, and a temperature gradient in order to deposit crystalline films with similar electronic properties to that of GaAs deposited by MOCVD. CSVT is similar to the vapor transport process used to deposit CdTe thin films and is thus a potentially scalable low-cost route to GaAs thin films.« less
  • Cited by 1
  • We investigate axial GaAs/InGaAs/GaAs heterostructures embedded in GaAs nanopillars via catalyst-free selective-area metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) indicates formation of axial In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}As (x{approx}0.20) inserts with thicknesses from 36 to 220 nm with {+-}10% variation and graded Ga:In transitions controlled by In segregation. Using the heterointerfaces as markers, the vertical growth rate is determined to increase linearly during growth. Photoluminescence from 77 to 290 K and EDS suggest the presence of strain in the shortest inserts. This capability to control the formation of axial nanopillar heterostructures is crucialmore » for optimized device integration.« less