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Title: Large scale nanoparticle screening for small molecule analysis in laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry

Abstract

Nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as efficient matrixes for small molecule profiling and imaging by laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), but so far there has been no systematic study comparing different NPs in the analysis of various classes of small molecules. Here, we present a large scale screening of 13 NPs for the analysis of two dozen small metabolite molecules. Many NPs showed much higher LDI efficiency than organic matrixes in positive mode and some NPs showed comparable efficiencies for selected analytes in negative mode. Our results suggest that a thermally driven desorption process is a key factor for metal oxide NPs, but chemical interactions are also very important, especially for other NPs. Furthermore, the screening results provide a useful guideline for the selection of NPs in the LDI-MS analysis of small molecules.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1]
  1. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States); Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)
  2. Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ames Laboratory (AMES), Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1337675
Report Number(s):
IS-J-8992
Journal ID: ISSN 0003-2700
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11358
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Analytical Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: 18; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-2700
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Yagnik, Gargey B., Hansen, Rebecca L., Korte, Andrew R., Reichert, Malinda D., Vela, Javier, and Lee, Young Jin. Large scale nanoparticle screening for small molecule analysis in laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.analchem.6b02732.
Yagnik, Gargey B., Hansen, Rebecca L., Korte, Andrew R., Reichert, Malinda D., Vela, Javier, & Lee, Young Jin. Large scale nanoparticle screening for small molecule analysis in laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.analchem.6b02732.
Yagnik, Gargey B., Hansen, Rebecca L., Korte, Andrew R., Reichert, Malinda D., Vela, Javier, and Lee, Young Jin. 2016. "Large scale nanoparticle screening for small molecule analysis in laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.analchem.6b02732. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1337675.
@article{osti_1337675,
title = {Large scale nanoparticle screening for small molecule analysis in laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry},
author = {Yagnik, Gargey B. and Hansen, Rebecca L. and Korte, Andrew R. and Reichert, Malinda D. and Vela, Javier and Lee, Young Jin},
abstractNote = {Nanoparticles (NPs) have been suggested as efficient matrixes for small molecule profiling and imaging by laser-desorption ionization mass spectrometry (LDI-MS), but so far there has been no systematic study comparing different NPs in the analysis of various classes of small molecules. Here, we present a large scale screening of 13 NPs for the analysis of two dozen small metabolite molecules. Many NPs showed much higher LDI efficiency than organic matrixes in positive mode and some NPs showed comparable efficiencies for selected analytes in negative mode. Our results suggest that a thermally driven desorption process is a key factor for metal oxide NPs, but chemical interactions are also very important, especially for other NPs. Furthermore, the screening results provide a useful guideline for the selection of NPs in the LDI-MS analysis of small molecules.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.analchem.6b02732},
journal = {Analytical Chemistry},
number = 18,
volume = 88,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
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