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Title: Pilot testing of a membrane system for postcombustion CO 2 capture

Abstract

This final report summarizes work conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) to scale up an efficient post-combustion CO 2 capture membrane process to the small pilot test stage (award number DE-FE0005795). The primary goal of this research program was to design, fabricate, and operate a membrane CO 2 capture system to treat coal-derived flue gas containing 20 tonnes CO 2/day (20 TPD). Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) conducted this project in collaboration with Babcock and Wilcox (B&W), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), WorleyParsons (WP), the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center (ISTC), Enerkem (EK), and the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). In addition to the small pilot design, build and slipstream testing at NCCC, other project efforts included laboratory membrane and module development at MTR, validation field testing on a 1 TPD membrane system at NCCC, boiler modeling and testing at B&W, a techno-economic analysis (TEA) by EPRI/WP, a case study of the membrane technology applied to a ~20 MWe power plant by ISTC, and an industrial CO 2 capture test at an Enerkem waste-to-biofuel facility. The 20 TPD small pilot membrane system built in this project successfully completed over 1,000 hours of operation treatingmore » flue gas at NCCC. The Polaris™ membranes used on this system demonstrated stable performance, and when combined with over 10,000 hours of operation at NCCC on a 1 TPD system, the risk associated with uncertainty in the durability of postcombustion capture membranes has been greatly reduced. Moreover, next-generation Polaris membranes with higher performance and lower cost were validation tested on the 1 TPD system. The 20 TPD system also demonstrated successful operation of a new low-pressure-drop sweep module that will reduce parasitic energy losses at full scale by as much as 10 MWe. In modeling and pilot boiler testing, B&W confirmed the viability of CO 2 recycle to the boiler as envisioned in the MTR process design. The impact of this CO 2 recycle on boiler efficiency was quantified and incorporated into a TEA of the membrane capture process applied to a full-scale power plant. As with previous studies, the TEA showed the membrane process to be lower cost than the conventional solvent capture process even at 90% CO 2capture. A sensitivity study indicates that the membrane capture cost decreases significantly if the 90% capture requirement is relaxed. Depending on the process design, a minimum capture cost is achieved at 30-60% capture, values that would meet proposed CO 2 emission regulations for coal-fired power plants. In summary, this project has successfully advanced the MTR membrane capture process through small pilot testing (technology readiness level 6). The technology is ready for future scale-up to the 10 MWe size.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Membrane Technology And Research, Incorporated, Newark, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1337555
DOE Contract Number:  
FE0005795
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS

Citation Formats

Merkel, Tim, Kniep, Jay, Wei, Xiaotong, Carlisle, Trevor, White, Steve, Pande, Saurabh, Fulton, Don, Watson, Robert, Hoffman, Thomas, Freeman, Brice, and Baker, Richard. Pilot testing of a membrane system for postcombustion CO2 capture. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.2172/1337555.
Merkel, Tim, Kniep, Jay, Wei, Xiaotong, Carlisle, Trevor, White, Steve, Pande, Saurabh, Fulton, Don, Watson, Robert, Hoffman, Thomas, Freeman, Brice, & Baker, Richard. Pilot testing of a membrane system for postcombustion CO2 capture. United States. doi:10.2172/1337555.
Merkel, Tim, Kniep, Jay, Wei, Xiaotong, Carlisle, Trevor, White, Steve, Pande, Saurabh, Fulton, Don, Watson, Robert, Hoffman, Thomas, Freeman, Brice, and Baker, Richard. Wed . "Pilot testing of a membrane system for postcombustion CO2 capture". United States. doi:10.2172/1337555. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1337555.
@article{osti_1337555,
title = {Pilot testing of a membrane system for postcombustion CO2 capture},
author = {Merkel, Tim and Kniep, Jay and Wei, Xiaotong and Carlisle, Trevor and White, Steve and Pande, Saurabh and Fulton, Don and Watson, Robert and Hoffman, Thomas and Freeman, Brice and Baker, Richard},
abstractNote = {This final report summarizes work conducted for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE) to scale up an efficient post-combustion CO2 capture membrane process to the small pilot test stage (award number DE-FE0005795). The primary goal of this research program was to design, fabricate, and operate a membrane CO2 capture system to treat coal-derived flue gas containing 20 tonnes CO2/day (20 TPD). Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) conducted this project in collaboration with Babcock and Wilcox (B&W), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), WorleyParsons (WP), the Illinois Sustainable Technology Center (ISTC), Enerkem (EK), and the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). In addition to the small pilot design, build and slipstream testing at NCCC, other project efforts included laboratory membrane and module development at MTR, validation field testing on a 1 TPD membrane system at NCCC, boiler modeling and testing at B&W, a techno-economic analysis (TEA) by EPRI/WP, a case study of the membrane technology applied to a ~20 MWe power plant by ISTC, and an industrial CO2 capture test at an Enerkem waste-to-biofuel facility. The 20 TPD small pilot membrane system built in this project successfully completed over 1,000 hours of operation treating flue gas at NCCC. The Polaris™ membranes used on this system demonstrated stable performance, and when combined with over 10,000 hours of operation at NCCC on a 1 TPD system, the risk associated with uncertainty in the durability of postcombustion capture membranes has been greatly reduced. Moreover, next-generation Polaris membranes with higher performance and lower cost were validation tested on the 1 TPD system. The 20 TPD system also demonstrated successful operation of a new low-pressure-drop sweep module that will reduce parasitic energy losses at full scale by as much as 10 MWe. In modeling and pilot boiler testing, B&W confirmed the viability of CO2 recycle to the boiler as envisioned in the MTR process design. The impact of this CO2 recycle on boiler efficiency was quantified and incorporated into a TEA of the membrane capture process applied to a full-scale power plant. As with previous studies, the TEA showed the membrane process to be lower cost than the conventional solvent capture process even at 90% CO2capture. A sensitivity study indicates that the membrane capture cost decreases significantly if the 90% capture requirement is relaxed. Depending on the process design, a minimum capture cost is achieved at 30-60% capture, values that would meet proposed CO2 emission regulations for coal-fired power plants. In summary, this project has successfully advanced the MTR membrane capture process through small pilot testing (technology readiness level 6). The technology is ready for future scale-up to the 10 MWe size.},
doi = {10.2172/1337555},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {9}
}