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Title: FIELD APPLICATION OF A PORTABLE DETECTOR FOR THE VERIFICATION OF RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT FUEL.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
  2. NON LANL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1337126
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-07-3123
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 29TH ESARDA ANNUAL MEETING ; 200705 ; AIX EN PROVENCE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

MENLOVE, HOWARD O., SWINHOE, MARTYN T., LEBRUN, ALAIN, LAFOLIE, ROGER, GODFREY, ROBERT, ROACH, DAVID, and EVERTON, CRAIG. FIELD APPLICATION OF A PORTABLE DETECTOR FOR THE VERIFICATION OF RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT FUEL.. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
MENLOVE, HOWARD O., SWINHOE, MARTYN T., LEBRUN, ALAIN, LAFOLIE, ROGER, GODFREY, ROBERT, ROACH, DAVID, & EVERTON, CRAIG. FIELD APPLICATION OF A PORTABLE DETECTOR FOR THE VERIFICATION OF RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT FUEL.. United States.
MENLOVE, HOWARD O., SWINHOE, MARTYN T., LEBRUN, ALAIN, LAFOLIE, ROGER, GODFREY, ROBERT, ROACH, DAVID, and EVERTON, CRAIG. Tue . "FIELD APPLICATION OF A PORTABLE DETECTOR FOR THE VERIFICATION OF RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT FUEL.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1337126.
@article{osti_1337126,
title = {FIELD APPLICATION OF A PORTABLE DETECTOR FOR THE VERIFICATION OF RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT FUEL.},
author = {MENLOVE, HOWARD O. and SWINHOE, MARTYN T. and LEBRUN, ALAIN and LAFOLIE, ROGER and GODFREY, ROBERT and ROACH, DAVID and EVERTON, CRAIG},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 08 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 08 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Expanding spent fuel dry storage activities worldwide are increasing demands on safeguards authorities that perform inspections. The European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) require measurements to verify declarations when spent fuel is transferred to difficult-to-access locations, such as dry storage casks and the repositories planned in Finland and Sweden. EURATOM makes routine use of the Fork detector to obtain gross gamma and total neutron measurements during spent fuel inspections. Data analysis is performed by modules in the integrated Review and Analysis Program (iRAP) software, developed jointly by EURATOM and the IAEA. Under the frameworkmore » of the US Department of Energy–EURATOM cooperation agreement, a module for automated Fork detector data analysis has been developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) using the ORIGEN code from the SCALE code system and implemented in iRAP. EURATOM and ORNL recently performed measurements on 30 spent fuel assemblies at the Swedish Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), operated by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). The measured assemblies represent a broad range of fuel characteristics. Neutron count rates for 15 measured pressurized water reactor assemblies are predicted with an average relative standard deviation of 4.6%, and gamma signals are predicted on average within 2.6% of the measurement. The 15 measured boiling water reactor assemblies exhibit slightly larger deviations of 5.2% for the gamma signals and 5.7% for the neutron count rates, compared to measurements. These findings suggest that with improved analysis of the measurement data, existing instruments can provide increased verification of operator declarations of the spent fuel and thereby also provide greater ability to confirm integrity of an assembly. These results support the application of the Fork detector as a fully quantitative spent fuel verification technique.« less
  • There are many situations in nonproliferation and international safeguards when one needs to verify spent research-reactor fuel. Special inspections, a reactor coming under safeguards for the first time, and failed surveillance are prime examples. Several years ago, Los Alamos developed the FORK detector for the IAEA and EURATOM. This detector, together with the GRAND electronics package, is used routinely by inspectors to verify light-water-reactor spent fuels. Both the FORK detector and the GRAND electronics technologies have been transferred and are now commercially available. Recent incidents in the world indicate that research-reactor fuel is potentially a greater concern for proliferation thanmore » light-water-reactor fuels. A device similar to the FORK/GRAND should be developed to verify research-reactor spent fuels because the signals from light-water-reactor spent fuel are quite different than those from research-reactor fuels.« less
  • The need for the development of a credible method and instrument for partial defect verification of spent fuel has been emphasized over a few decades in the safeguards communities as the diverted spent fuel pins can be the source of nuclear terrorism or devices. The need is increasingly more important and even urgent as many countries have started to transfer spent fuel to so called 'difficult-to-access' areas such as dry storage casks, reprocessing or geological repositories. Partial defect verification is required by IAEA before spent fuel is placed into 'difficult-to-access' areas. Earlier, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has reported themore » successful development of a new, credible partial defect verification method for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel assemblies without use of operator data, and further reported the validation experiments using commercial spent fuel assemblies with some missing fuel pins. The method was found to be robust as the method is relatively invariant to the characteristic variations of spent fuel assemblies such as initial fuel enrichment, cooling time, and burn-up. Since then, the PDET system has been designed and prototyped for 17x17 PWR spent fuel assemblies, complete with data acquisition software and acquisition electronics. In this paper, a summary description of the PDET development followed by results of the first successful field testing using the integrated PDET system and actual spent fuel assemblies performed in a commercial spent fuel storage site, known as Central Interim Spent fuel Storage Facility (CLAB) in Sweden will be presented. In addition to partial defect detection initial studies have determined that the tool can be used to verify the operator declared average burnup of the assembly as well as intra-assembly burnup levels. (authors)« less