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Title: Evaluating the Magnitude and Duration of Cold Load Pick-up on Residential Distribution Feeders Using Multi-State Load Models

Abstract

The increased level of demand that is associated with the restoration of service after an outage, Cold Load Pick-Up (CLPU), can be significantly higher than pre-outage levels, even exceeding the normal distribution feeder peak demand. These high levels of demand can delay restoration efforts and in extreme cases damage equipment. The negative impacts of CLPU can be mitigated with strategies that restore the feeder in sections, minimizing the load current. The challenge for utilities is to manage the current level on critical equipment while minimizing the time to restore service to all customers. Accurately modeling CLPU events is the first step in developing improved restoration strategies that minimize restoration times. This paper presents a new method for evaluating the magnitude of the CLPU peak, and its duration, using multi-state load models. The use of multi-state load models allows for a more accurate representation of the end-use loads that are present on residential distribution feeders.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1336006
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-122124
Journal ID: ISSN 0885-8950; 453060031
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IEEE Transactions on Power Systems; Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION

Citation Formats

Schneider, Kevin P., Sortomme, Eric, Venkata, S. S., Miller, Melanie T., and Ponder, Leslie. Evaluating the Magnitude and Duration of Cold Load Pick-up on Residential Distribution Feeders Using Multi-State Load Models. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1109/TPWRS.2015.2494882.
Schneider, Kevin P., Sortomme, Eric, Venkata, S. S., Miller, Melanie T., & Ponder, Leslie. Evaluating the Magnitude and Duration of Cold Load Pick-up on Residential Distribution Feeders Using Multi-State Load Models. United States. doi:10.1109/TPWRS.2015.2494882.
Schneider, Kevin P., Sortomme, Eric, Venkata, S. S., Miller, Melanie T., and Ponder, Leslie. 2016. "Evaluating the Magnitude and Duration of Cold Load Pick-up on Residential Distribution Feeders Using Multi-State Load Models". United States. doi:10.1109/TPWRS.2015.2494882.
@article{osti_1336006,
title = {Evaluating the Magnitude and Duration of Cold Load Pick-up on Residential Distribution Feeders Using Multi-State Load Models},
author = {Schneider, Kevin P. and Sortomme, Eric and Venkata, S. S. and Miller, Melanie T. and Ponder, Leslie},
abstractNote = {The increased level of demand that is associated with the restoration of service after an outage, Cold Load Pick-Up (CLPU), can be significantly higher than pre-outage levels, even exceeding the normal distribution feeder peak demand. These high levels of demand can delay restoration efforts and in extreme cases damage equipment. The negative impacts of CLPU can be mitigated with strategies that restore the feeder in sections, minimizing the load current. The challenge for utilities is to manage the current level on critical equipment while minimizing the time to restore service to all customers. Accurately modeling CLPU events is the first step in developing improved restoration strategies that minimize restoration times. This paper presents a new method for evaluating the magnitude of the CLPU peak, and its duration, using multi-state load models. The use of multi-state load models allows for a more accurate representation of the end-use loads that are present on residential distribution feeders.},
doi = {10.1109/TPWRS.2015.2494882},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Power Systems},
number = 5,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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