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Title: Resistance mutations generate divergent antibiotic susceptibility profiles against translation inhibitors

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
INDUSTRY
OSTI Identifier:
1335990
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America; Journal Volume: 113; Journal Issue: 29
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Cocozaki, Alexis I., Altman, Roger B., Huang, Jian, Buurman, Ed T., Kazmirski, Steven L., Doig, Peter, Prince, D. Bryan, Blanchard, Scott C., Cate, Jamie H. D., and Ferguson, Andrew D.. Resistance mutations generate divergent antibiotic susceptibility profiles against translation inhibitors. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1605127113.
Cocozaki, Alexis I., Altman, Roger B., Huang, Jian, Buurman, Ed T., Kazmirski, Steven L., Doig, Peter, Prince, D. Bryan, Blanchard, Scott C., Cate, Jamie H. D., & Ferguson, Andrew D.. Resistance mutations generate divergent antibiotic susceptibility profiles against translation inhibitors. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1605127113.
Cocozaki, Alexis I., Altman, Roger B., Huang, Jian, Buurman, Ed T., Kazmirski, Steven L., Doig, Peter, Prince, D. Bryan, Blanchard, Scott C., Cate, Jamie H. D., and Ferguson, Andrew D.. 2016. "Resistance mutations generate divergent antibiotic susceptibility profiles against translation inhibitors". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1605127113.
@article{osti_1335990,
title = {Resistance mutations generate divergent antibiotic susceptibility profiles against translation inhibitors},
author = {Cocozaki, Alexis I. and Altman, Roger B. and Huang, Jian and Buurman, Ed T. and Kazmirski, Steven L. and Doig, Peter and Prince, D. Bryan and Blanchard, Scott C. and Cate, Jamie H. D. and Ferguson, Andrew D.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1605127113},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 29,
volume = 113,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
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