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Title: Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Curved Surfaces: Buckyballs

Abstract

The discovery of a new allotropic form of elemental carbon – the fullerenes – and subsequently other novel forms of elemental carbon with pyramidalized surfaces, most notably single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, introduced a novel structural motif to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with nonplanar surfaces. Our research program supported by BES DOE grant DE-FG02-04ER15514 has dealt with the synthesis, structural studies, and chemistry of the novel curved-surface PAHs with carbon frameworks structurally related to fullerenes. They are referred to as “buckybowls”. We prepared several new buckybowls and, even more importantly, developed the efficient, gram-scale synthetic methodologies for the preparation of small buckybowls, most notably corannulene (C20H10) and its derivatives. In addition, the employment of the corannulene-based synthons previously developed in our laboratory led to a number of highly nonplanar molecular architectures with two or more corannulene subunits with a potential for the applications as novel materials in separation sciences, nanoelectronics, photovoltaics and catalysis. In collaboration with Professor Angelici (Iowa State) we prepared and characterized several transition metal complexes of corannulene, providing the first structural characterization of η6 metal complexes of buckybowls by a single crystal X-ray diffraction. In addition to the definitive structural characterization of the complexes we demonstratedmore » that the (η6-C6Me6)Ru2+ unit in some relatively stable complexes activate the corannulene ligand to react with proper nucleophiles suggesting that such complexex may be used in catalysis. (Section C). We have explored the efficiency of the dispersion-based interactions of curved-surface conjugated carbon networks by high-level computational models. We showed that the curvature of such networks does not reduce the van der Waals attractions as compared to the planar systems of similar size. We than concentrated on the design, synthesis and testing of the previously unknown molecular receptors with corannulene pincers which are capable of forming the strong ball-and-socket inclusion complexes with fullerenes in solution and in the solid state. Buckycatcher I (a molecular receptor with two corannulene pincers preorganized on a tetrabensocyclooctatetraene tether) inclusion complexes with fullerenes provided the first experimental evidence for the importance of concave-convex π – π interactions in the supramolecular chemistry of fullerene carbon cages with buckybowls. C60@Buckycatcher I has become the prototypical supramolecular system formed by the relatively weak (on the atom-to-atom bases) and has been extensively used by the computational community to test the quality of the theoretical models. In addition, Buckycatcher I shows an exceptional ability to adopt other guest molecules and several its inclusion complexes and/or solvates have been structurally characterized. These unusual structures show the potential of the buckycatchers to be tested as novel organic materials. “Intelligent design” of molecular receptors with corannulene receptors using computational approach allowing for a priori prediction of their binding potentials led to the preparation of other buckycatchers. Both bi- and tridentate corannulene pincers were tested and two of the bidentate receptors (Buckycatchers II and III) exhibited the outstanding affinity toward fullerenes, significantly exciding Buckycatcher I performance. Careful tailoring of the tethers resulted in the optimization of binding energies of the receptors with guest carbon cages and in the reduction of the entropy/solvation penalties. Practical preparation of dicorannulenopentacene opens a new avenue for the synthesis of a pool of bis-corannulene receptors possessing polar groups on their dibenzobarrelene tether. The polar “anchors” can be used to attach these efficient fullerene receptors to solid supports in order to modify their surfaces with the potential applications in separation sciences, catalysis and photovoltaic materials. additionally, the presence of such groups will improve the solubility of the receptors in polar solvents, expanding the scope of their supramolecular chemistry in solutions. Rigorous studies of thermodynamics of host-guest association of molecular clips and tweezers in organic solvents with C60/C70 inclusion complexes with Buckycatcher I as a model system have provided a full set of thermodynamical data including ΔG, ΔH, and –TΔS, for the formation of the inclusion complexes over a range of temperatures and in several solvents. Both 1H NMR and Isothermal Calorimetry (ITC) titrations provide virtually identical association constants, confirming the reliability of the results. WE have shown that thermodynamics of the host-guest complex formation is more complicated than anticipated and proposed by the existing computational models. These data are of premium importance for the testing of the computational solvation models and for a deeper understanding of the supramolecular interactions in organic solvents.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1335963
Report Number(s):
DOE-MSSTATE-15514
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-04ER15514
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; buckybowls; supramolecular chemistry; organic synthesis

Citation Formats

Sygula, Andrzej. Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Curved Surfaces: Buckyballs. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1335963.
Sygula, Andrzej. Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Curved Surfaces: Buckyballs. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1335963
Sygula, Andrzej. Mon . "Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Curved Surfaces: Buckyballs". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/1335963. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1335963.
@article{osti_1335963,
title = {Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Curved Surfaces: Buckyballs},
author = {Sygula, Andrzej},
abstractNote = {The discovery of a new allotropic form of elemental carbon – the fullerenes – and subsequently other novel forms of elemental carbon with pyramidalized surfaces, most notably single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, introduced a novel structural motif to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) with nonplanar surfaces. Our research program supported by BES DOE grant DE-FG02-04ER15514 has dealt with the synthesis, structural studies, and chemistry of the novel curved-surface PAHs with carbon frameworks structurally related to fullerenes. They are referred to as “buckybowls”. We prepared several new buckybowls and, even more importantly, developed the efficient, gram-scale synthetic methodologies for the preparation of small buckybowls, most notably corannulene (C20H10) and its derivatives. In addition, the employment of the corannulene-based synthons previously developed in our laboratory led to a number of highly nonplanar molecular architectures with two or more corannulene subunits with a potential for the applications as novel materials in separation sciences, nanoelectronics, photovoltaics and catalysis. In collaboration with Professor Angelici (Iowa State) we prepared and characterized several transition metal complexes of corannulene, providing the first structural characterization of η6 metal complexes of buckybowls by a single crystal X-ray diffraction. In addition to the definitive structural characterization of the complexes we demonstrated that the (η6-C6Me6)Ru2+ unit in some relatively stable complexes activate the corannulene ligand to react with proper nucleophiles suggesting that such complexex may be used in catalysis. (Section C). We have explored the efficiency of the dispersion-based interactions of curved-surface conjugated carbon networks by high-level computational models. We showed that the curvature of such networks does not reduce the van der Waals attractions as compared to the planar systems of similar size. We than concentrated on the design, synthesis and testing of the previously unknown molecular receptors with corannulene pincers which are capable of forming the strong ball-and-socket inclusion complexes with fullerenes in solution and in the solid state. Buckycatcher I (a molecular receptor with two corannulene pincers preorganized on a tetrabensocyclooctatetraene tether) inclusion complexes with fullerenes provided the first experimental evidence for the importance of concave-convex π – π interactions in the supramolecular chemistry of fullerene carbon cages with buckybowls. C60@Buckycatcher I has become the prototypical supramolecular system formed by the relatively weak (on the atom-to-atom bases) and has been extensively used by the computational community to test the quality of the theoretical models. In addition, Buckycatcher I shows an exceptional ability to adopt other guest molecules and several its inclusion complexes and/or solvates have been structurally characterized. These unusual structures show the potential of the buckycatchers to be tested as novel organic materials. “Intelligent design” of molecular receptors with corannulene receptors using computational approach allowing for a priori prediction of their binding potentials led to the preparation of other buckycatchers. Both bi- and tridentate corannulene pincers were tested and two of the bidentate receptors (Buckycatchers II and III) exhibited the outstanding affinity toward fullerenes, significantly exciding Buckycatcher I performance. Careful tailoring of the tethers resulted in the optimization of binding energies of the receptors with guest carbon cages and in the reduction of the entropy/solvation penalties. Practical preparation of dicorannulenopentacene opens a new avenue for the synthesis of a pool of bis-corannulene receptors possessing polar groups on their dibenzobarrelene tether. The polar “anchors” can be used to attach these efficient fullerene receptors to solid supports in order to modify their surfaces with the potential applications in separation sciences, catalysis and photovoltaic materials. additionally, the presence of such groups will improve the solubility of the receptors in polar solvents, expanding the scope of their supramolecular chemistry in solutions. Rigorous studies of thermodynamics of host-guest association of molecular clips and tweezers in organic solvents with C60/C70 inclusion complexes with Buckycatcher I as a model system have provided a full set of thermodynamical data including ΔG, ΔH, and –TΔS, for the formation of the inclusion complexes over a range of temperatures and in several solvents. Both 1H NMR and Isothermal Calorimetry (ITC) titrations provide virtually identical association constants, confirming the reliability of the results. WE have shown that thermodynamics of the host-guest complex formation is more complicated than anticipated and proposed by the existing computational models. These data are of premium importance for the testing of the computational solvation models and for a deeper understanding of the supramolecular interactions in organic solvents.},
doi = {10.2172/1335963},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/1335963}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {8}
}