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Title: Copper Nanoparticle Induced Cytotoxicity to Nitrifying Bacteria in Wastewater Treatment: A Mechanistic Copper Speciation Study by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USEPA
OSTI Identifier:
1334808
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Science and Technology; Journal Volume: 50; Journal Issue: 17
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Clar, Justin G., Li, Xuan, Impellitteri, Christopher A., Bennett-Stamper, Christina, and Luxton, Todd P. Copper Nanoparticle Induced Cytotoxicity to Nitrifying Bacteria in Wastewater Treatment: A Mechanistic Copper Speciation Study by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.est.6b01910.
Clar, Justin G., Li, Xuan, Impellitteri, Christopher A., Bennett-Stamper, Christina, & Luxton, Todd P. Copper Nanoparticle Induced Cytotoxicity to Nitrifying Bacteria in Wastewater Treatment: A Mechanistic Copper Speciation Study by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.6b01910.
Clar, Justin G., Li, Xuan, Impellitteri, Christopher A., Bennett-Stamper, Christina, and Luxton, Todd P. 2016. "Copper Nanoparticle Induced Cytotoxicity to Nitrifying Bacteria in Wastewater Treatment: A Mechanistic Copper Speciation Study by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.6b01910.
@article{osti_1334808,
title = {Copper Nanoparticle Induced Cytotoxicity to Nitrifying Bacteria in Wastewater Treatment: A Mechanistic Copper Speciation Study by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy},
author = {Clar, Justin G. and Li, Xuan and Impellitteri, Christopher A. and Bennett-Stamper, Christina and Luxton, Todd P.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acs.est.6b01910},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 17,
volume = 50,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
  • Nitrification of ammonia (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) is a critical component for improved systems of animal wastewater treatment. One of the most effective processes uses nitrifying microorganisms encapsulated in polymer resins. It is used in Japan in municipal wastewater treatment plants for higher nitrification rates, shorter hydraulic retention times (HRT), and lower aeration treatment cost. The authors evaluated whether this technology could be adapted for treatment of higher-strength lagoon swine wastewaters containing {approximately}230 mg NH{sub 4}-N/L and 195 mg BOD{sub 5}/L. A culture of acclimated lagoon nitrifying sludge (ALNS) was prepared from a nitrifying biofilm developed in an overland flow soilmore » using fill-and-draw cultivation. The ALNS was successfully immobilized in 3- to 5-mm polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) polymer pellets by a PVA-freezing method. Swine wastewater was treated in aerated, suspended bioreactors with a 15% (w/v) pellet concentration using batch and continuous flow treatment. Alkalinity was supplemented with inorganic carbon to maintain the liquid pH within an optimum range (7.7--8.4). In batch treatment, only 14 h were needed for nitrification of NH{sub 4}{sup +}. Ammonia was nitrified readily, decreasing at a rate of 16.1 mg NH{sub 4}-N/L h. In contrast, it took 10 d for a control (no-pellets) aerated reactor to start nitrification; furthermore, 70% of the N was lost by air stripping. Without alkalinity supplements, the pH of the liquid fell to 6.0--6.2, and NH{sub 4}{sup +} oxidation stopped. In continuous flow treatment, nitrification efficiencies of 95% were obtained with NH{sub 4}{sup +} loading rates of 418 mg-N/L-reactor d (2.73 g-N/g-pellet d) and an HRT of 12 h. The rate of nitrification obtained with HRT of 4 h was 567 mg-N/L d. In all cases, the NH{sub 4}-N removed was entirely recovered in oxidized N forms. Nitrification rates obtained in this work were not greatly affected by high NH{sub 4}{sup +} or BOD concentration of swine wastewater. Thus, immobilized pellet technology can be adapted for fast and efficient removal of NH{sub 4}{sup +} contained in anaerobic swine lagoons using acclimated microorganisms.« less
  • This work has shown the fluorescent antibody (FA) technique is a rapid and reproducible method for enumerating the levels of Nitrosomonas cells in coke-plant mixed liquor. The FA technique indicates that coke-plant mixed liquor contains about four orders of magnitude more Nitrosomonas cells than shown by MPN estimates. The FA technique indicates that Nitrosomonas comprises about 2% of the total cells in coke-plant mixed liquor at 25 day SRTs or greater and 1% at 4.2 day SRT. The nitrifying population in coke-plant mixed liquor has reserve capacity for oxidizing additional ammonia when treating moderate ammonia levels (approx. = 200 mg/l)more » at a 25-day SRT. The correlations between effluent ammonia and the population dynamics of Nitrosomonas indicate that the rate of ammonia removal in coke-plant mixed liquor is affected by both the number of nitrifiers and the activity per cell.« less
  • X-ray absorption spectroscopy allowed elucidation of reversible interconversion of copper ions to nano-size Cu 0and retention of the manganese oxide framework upon cycling of copper birnessite in lithium batteries, rationalizing the enhanced capacity over copper-free birnessite.
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  • Drinking-water treatment residuals (WTRs) present a low-cost geosorbent for As-contaminated waters and soils. Previous work has demonstrated the high affinity of WTRs for As, but data pertaining to the stability of sorbed As is missing. Sorption/desorption and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), both XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) studies, were combined to determine the stability of As sorbed by an Fe-based WTR. Arsenic(V) and As(III) sorption kinetics were biphasic in nature, sorbing <90% of the initial added As (15,000 mg kg{sup -1}) after 48 h of reaction. Subsequent desorption experiments with a highmore » P load (7500 mg kg{sup -1}) showed negligible As desorption for both As species, approximately <3.5% of sorbed As; the small amount of desorbed As was attributed to the abundance of sorption sites. XANES data showed that sorption kinetics for either As(III) or As(V) initially added to solution had no effect on the sorbed As oxidation state. EXAFS spectroscopy suggested that As added either as As(III) or as As(V) formed inner-sphere mononuclear, bidentate complexes, suggesting the stability of the sorbed As, which was further corroborated by the minimum As desorption from the Fe-WTR.« less