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Title: Estimates of Glacier Mass Loss and Contribution to Streamflow in the Wind River Range in Wyoming: Case Study

Abstract

The Wind River Range is a continuous mountain range, approximately 160 km in length, in west-central Wyoming. The presence of glaciers results in meltwater contributions to streamflow during the late summer (July, August, and September: JAS) when snowmelt is decreasing; temperatures are high; precipitation is low; evaporation rates are high; and municipal, industrial, and irrigation water are at peak demands. Therefore, the quantification of glacier meltwater (e.g., volume and mass) contributions to late summer/early fall streamflow is important, given that this resource is dwindling owing to glacier recession. The current research expands upon previous research efforts and identifies two glaciated watersheds, one on the east slope (Bull Lake Creek) and one on the west slope (Green River) of the Wind River Range, in which unimpaired streamflow is available from 1966 to 2006. Glaciers were delineated within each watershed and area estimates (with error) were obtained for the years 1966, 1989, and 2006. Glacier volume (mass) loss (with error) was estimated by using empirically based volume-area scaling relationships. For 1966 to 2006, glacier mass contributions to JAS streamflow on the east slope were approximately 8%, whereas those on the west slope were approximately 2%. Furthermore, the volume-area scaling glacier mass estimatesmore » compared favorably with measured (stereo pair remote sensed data) estimates of glacier mass change for three glaciers (Teton, Middle Teton, and Teepe) in the nearby Teton Range and one glacier (Dinwoody) in the Wind River Range.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States). Dept. of Civil Construction and Environmental Engineering
  4. Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Office of Water Programs
  5. Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States). Dept. of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1334445
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Hydrologic Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 20; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 1084-0699
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; Glacier; Mass; Streamflow; Climate; UNITED-STATES; VARIABILITY; USA

Citation Formats

Marks, Jeffrey, Piburn, Jesse, Tootle, Glenn, Kerr, Greg, and Oubeidillah, Abdoul. Estimates of Glacier Mass Loss and Contribution to Streamflow in the Wind River Range in Wyoming: Case Study. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)HE.1943-5584.0001050.
Marks, Jeffrey, Piburn, Jesse, Tootle, Glenn, Kerr, Greg, & Oubeidillah, Abdoul. Estimates of Glacier Mass Loss and Contribution to Streamflow in the Wind River Range in Wyoming: Case Study. United States. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)HE.1943-5584.0001050.
Marks, Jeffrey, Piburn, Jesse, Tootle, Glenn, Kerr, Greg, and Oubeidillah, Abdoul. Thu . "Estimates of Glacier Mass Loss and Contribution to Streamflow in the Wind River Range in Wyoming: Case Study". United States. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)HE.1943-5584.0001050.
@article{osti_1334445,
title = {Estimates of Glacier Mass Loss and Contribution to Streamflow in the Wind River Range in Wyoming: Case Study},
author = {Marks, Jeffrey and Piburn, Jesse and Tootle, Glenn and Kerr, Greg and Oubeidillah, Abdoul},
abstractNote = {The Wind River Range is a continuous mountain range, approximately 160 km in length, in west-central Wyoming. The presence of glaciers results in meltwater contributions to streamflow during the late summer (July, August, and September: JAS) when snowmelt is decreasing; temperatures are high; precipitation is low; evaporation rates are high; and municipal, industrial, and irrigation water are at peak demands. Therefore, the quantification of glacier meltwater (e.g., volume and mass) contributions to late summer/early fall streamflow is important, given that this resource is dwindling owing to glacier recession. The current research expands upon previous research efforts and identifies two glaciated watersheds, one on the east slope (Bull Lake Creek) and one on the west slope (Green River) of the Wind River Range, in which unimpaired streamflow is available from 1966 to 2006. Glaciers were delineated within each watershed and area estimates (with error) were obtained for the years 1966, 1989, and 2006. Glacier volume (mass) loss (with error) was estimated by using empirically based volume-area scaling relationships. For 1966 to 2006, glacier mass contributions to JAS streamflow on the east slope were approximately 8%, whereas those on the west slope were approximately 2%. Furthermore, the volume-area scaling glacier mass estimates compared favorably with measured (stereo pair remote sensed data) estimates of glacier mass change for three glaciers (Teton, Middle Teton, and Teepe) in the nearby Teton Range and one glacier (Dinwoody) in the Wind River Range.},
doi = {10.1061/(ASCE)HE.1943-5584.0001050},
journal = {Journal of Hydrologic Engineering},
issn = {1084-0699},
number = 8,
volume = 20,
place = {United States},
year = {2014},
month = {9}
}