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Title: Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States: Methodology and Initial Results

Abstract

The report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, is defined in this report as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Energy Analysis (EI-30) (Energy Analysis Corporate)
OSTI Identifier:
1334386
Report Number(s):
NREL/TP-6A20-64503
7541
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; fuel prices, capital cost, plant efficiency, resource potential, market potential

Citation Formats

Brown, Austin, Beiter, Philipp, Heimiller, Donna, Davidson, Carolyn, Denholm, Paul, Melius, Jennifer, Lopez, Anthony, Hettinger, Dylan, Mulcahy, David, and Porro, Gian. Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States: Methodology and Initial Results. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1334386.
Brown, Austin, Beiter, Philipp, Heimiller, Donna, Davidson, Carolyn, Denholm, Paul, Melius, Jennifer, Lopez, Anthony, Hettinger, Dylan, Mulcahy, David, & Porro, Gian. Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States: Methodology and Initial Results. United States. doi:10.2172/1334386.
Brown, Austin, Beiter, Philipp, Heimiller, Donna, Davidson, Carolyn, Denholm, Paul, Melius, Jennifer, Lopez, Anthony, Hettinger, Dylan, Mulcahy, David, and Porro, Gian. Mon . "Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States: Methodology and Initial Results". United States. doi:10.2172/1334386. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1334386.
@article{osti_1334386,
title = {Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States: Methodology and Initial Results},
author = {Brown, Austin and Beiter, Philipp and Heimiller, Donna and Davidson, Carolyn and Denholm, Paul and Melius, Jennifer and Lopez, Anthony and Hettinger, Dylan and Mulcahy, David and Porro, Gian},
abstractNote = {The report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, is defined in this report as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity.},
doi = {10.2172/1334386},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

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