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Title: Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope

Abstract

The highly energetic electron beam from a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can induce local changes in the state of matter, ranging from local knock-out and atomic movement, to amorphization/crystallization, and chemical/electrochemical reactions occuring at localized liquid-solid and gas-solid interfaces. To date, fundamental studies of e-beam induced phenomena and practical applications have been limited by conventional e-beam rastering modes that allow only for uniform e-beam exposures. Here we develop an automated liquid phase nanolithography method that is capable of directly writing nanometer scaled features within silicon nitride encapsulated liquid cells. An external beam control system, connected to the scan coils of an aberration-corrected STEM, is used to precisely control the position, dwell time, and scan velocity of a sub-nanometer STEM probe. Site-specific locations in a sealed liquid cell containing an aqueous solution of H 2PdCl 4 are irradiated to controllably deposit palladium onto silicon nitride membranes. We determine the threshold electron dose required for the radiolytic deposition of metallic palladium, explore the influence of electron dose on the feature size and morphology of nanolithographically patterned nanostructures, and propose a feedback-controlled monitoring method for active control of the nanofabricated structures through STEM detector signal monitoring. As a result, this approach enablesmore » both fundamental studies of electron beam induced interactions with matter, as well as opens a pathway to fabricate nanostructures with tailored architectures and chemistries via shape-controlled nanolithographic patterning from liquid phase precursors.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1333640
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nanoscale
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 34; Journal ID: ISSN 2040-3364
Publisher:
Royal Society of Chemistry
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; 43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS

Citation Formats

Unocic, Raymond R., Lupini, Andrew R., Borisevich, Albina Y., Cullen, David A., Kalinin, Sergei V., and Jesse, Stephen. Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1039/C6NR04994J.
Unocic, Raymond R., Lupini, Andrew R., Borisevich, Albina Y., Cullen, David A., Kalinin, Sergei V., & Jesse, Stephen. Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope. United States. doi:10.1039/C6NR04994J.
Unocic, Raymond R., Lupini, Andrew R., Borisevich, Albina Y., Cullen, David A., Kalinin, Sergei V., and Jesse, Stephen. 2016. "Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope". United States. doi:10.1039/C6NR04994J. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1333640.
@article{osti_1333640,
title = {Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope},
author = {Unocic, Raymond R. and Lupini, Andrew R. and Borisevich, Albina Y. and Cullen, David A. and Kalinin, Sergei V. and Jesse, Stephen},
abstractNote = {The highly energetic electron beam from a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can induce local changes in the state of matter, ranging from local knock-out and atomic movement, to amorphization/crystallization, and chemical/electrochemical reactions occuring at localized liquid-solid and gas-solid interfaces. To date, fundamental studies of e-beam induced phenomena and practical applications have been limited by conventional e-beam rastering modes that allow only for uniform e-beam exposures. Here we develop an automated liquid phase nanolithography method that is capable of directly writing nanometer scaled features within silicon nitride encapsulated liquid cells. An external beam control system, connected to the scan coils of an aberration-corrected STEM, is used to precisely control the position, dwell time, and scan velocity of a sub-nanometer STEM probe. Site-specific locations in a sealed liquid cell containing an aqueous solution of H2PdCl4 are irradiated to controllably deposit palladium onto silicon nitride membranes. We determine the threshold electron dose required for the radiolytic deposition of metallic palladium, explore the influence of electron dose on the feature size and morphology of nanolithographically patterned nanostructures, and propose a feedback-controlled monitoring method for active control of the nanofabricated structures through STEM detector signal monitoring. As a result, this approach enables both fundamental studies of electron beam induced interactions with matter, as well as opens a pathway to fabricate nanostructures with tailored architectures and chemistries via shape-controlled nanolithographic patterning from liquid phase precursors.},
doi = {10.1039/C6NR04994J},
journal = {Nanoscale},
number = 34,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

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Cited by: 3works
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