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Title: Are policy incentives for solar power effective? Evidence from residential installations in the Northeast

Abstract

State incentives for solar power have grown significantly in the past several years. This paper examines the effectiveness of policy incentives to increase residential solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity. We use county-level panel data and control for demographic characteristics, solar resources, and pro-environmental preferences. Results show that among financial incentives, rebates have the most impact with an additional $1 per watt rebate increasing annual PV capacity additions by close to 50%. Factors that affect financial returns to solar PV such as electricity price and solar insolation are also found to be significant. Results also point to a significant positive relationship between hybrid vehicle sales and residential PV capacity growth, indicating the importance of pro-environmental preferences as a predictor of solar PV demand. Back of the envelope calculations suggest that the cost of carbon mitigation through rebates is around $184 per ton of CO2.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1332483
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-6A20-67430
Journal ID: ISSN 0095-0696
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Environmental Economics and Management; Journal Volume: 81
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; solar PV; renewable energy policies; incentives for solar PV

Citation Formats

Crago, Christine Lasco, and Chernyakhovskiy, Ilya. Are policy incentives for solar power effective? Evidence from residential installations in the Northeast. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jeem.2016.09.008.
Crago, Christine Lasco, & Chernyakhovskiy, Ilya. Are policy incentives for solar power effective? Evidence from residential installations in the Northeast. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jeem.2016.09.008.
Crago, Christine Lasco, and Chernyakhovskiy, Ilya. Sun . "Are policy incentives for solar power effective? Evidence from residential installations in the Northeast". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jeem.2016.09.008.
@article{osti_1332483,
title = {Are policy incentives for solar power effective? Evidence from residential installations in the Northeast},
author = {Crago, Christine Lasco and Chernyakhovskiy, Ilya},
abstractNote = {State incentives for solar power have grown significantly in the past several years. This paper examines the effectiveness of policy incentives to increase residential solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity. We use county-level panel data and control for demographic characteristics, solar resources, and pro-environmental preferences. Results show that among financial incentives, rebates have the most impact with an additional $1 per watt rebate increasing annual PV capacity additions by close to 50%. Factors that affect financial returns to solar PV such as electricity price and solar insolation are also found to be significant. Results also point to a significant positive relationship between hybrid vehicle sales and residential PV capacity growth, indicating the importance of pro-environmental preferences as a predictor of solar PV demand. Back of the envelope calculations suggest that the cost of carbon mitigation through rebates is around $184 per ton of CO2.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jeem.2016.09.008},
journal = {Journal of Environmental Economics and Management},
number = ,
volume = 81,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
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