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Title: Dislocation mediated alignment during metal nanoparticle coalescence

Abstract

Dislocation mediated alignment processes during gold nanoparticle coalescence were studied at low and high temperatures using molecular dynamics simulations and transmission electron microscopy. Particles underwent rigid body rotations immediately following attachment in both low temperature (500 K) simulated coalescence events and low temperature (~315 K) transmission electron microscopy beam heating experiments. In many low temperature simulations, some degree of misorientation between particles remained after rigid body rotations, which was accommodated by grain boundary dislocation nodes. These dislocations were either sessile and remained at the interface for the duration of the simulation or dissociated and cross-slipped through the adjacent particles, leading to improved co-alignment. Minimal rigid body rotations were observed during or immediately following attachment in high temperature (1100 K) simulations, which is attributed to enhanced diffusion at the particles' interface. However, rotation was eventually induced by {111} slip on planes parallel to the neck groove. These deformation modes led to the formation of single and multi-fold twins whose structures depended on the initial orientation of the particles. The driving force for {111} slip is attributed to high surface stresses near the intersection of low energy {111} facets in the neck region. The details of this twinning process were examined inmore » detail using simulated trajectories, and the results reveal possible mechanisms for the nucleation and propagation of Shockley partials on consecutive planes. Deformation twinning was also observed in-situ using transmission electron microscopy, which resulted in the co-alignment of a set of the particles' {111} planes across their grain boundary and an increase in their dihedral angle. As a result, this constitutes the first detailed experimental observation of deformation twinning during nanoparticle coalescence, validating simulation results presented here and elsewhere.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1332467
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-695366
Journal ID: ISSN 1359-6454
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Acta Materialia
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 120; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1359-6454
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; nanoparticle coalescence; nanoparticle sintering; dislocations; twinning; oriented attachment

Citation Formats

Lange, A. P., Samanta, A., Majidi, H., Mahajan, S., Ging, J., Olson, T. Y., van Benthem, K., and Elhadj, S. Dislocation mediated alignment during metal nanoparticle coalescence. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2016.08.061.
Lange, A. P., Samanta, A., Majidi, H., Mahajan, S., Ging, J., Olson, T. Y., van Benthem, K., & Elhadj, S. Dislocation mediated alignment during metal nanoparticle coalescence. United States. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2016.08.061.
Lange, A. P., Samanta, A., Majidi, H., Mahajan, S., Ging, J., Olson, T. Y., van Benthem, K., and Elhadj, S. 2016. "Dislocation mediated alignment during metal nanoparticle coalescence". United States. doi:10.1016/j.actamat.2016.08.061. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1332467.
@article{osti_1332467,
title = {Dislocation mediated alignment during metal nanoparticle coalescence},
author = {Lange, A. P. and Samanta, A. and Majidi, H. and Mahajan, S. and Ging, J. and Olson, T. Y. and van Benthem, K. and Elhadj, S.},
abstractNote = {Dislocation mediated alignment processes during gold nanoparticle coalescence were studied at low and high temperatures using molecular dynamics simulations and transmission electron microscopy. Particles underwent rigid body rotations immediately following attachment in both low temperature (500 K) simulated coalescence events and low temperature (~315 K) transmission electron microscopy beam heating experiments. In many low temperature simulations, some degree of misorientation between particles remained after rigid body rotations, which was accommodated by grain boundary dislocation nodes. These dislocations were either sessile and remained at the interface for the duration of the simulation or dissociated and cross-slipped through the adjacent particles, leading to improved co-alignment. Minimal rigid body rotations were observed during or immediately following attachment in high temperature (1100 K) simulations, which is attributed to enhanced diffusion at the particles' interface. However, rotation was eventually induced by {111} slip on planes parallel to the neck groove. These deformation modes led to the formation of single and multi-fold twins whose structures depended on the initial orientation of the particles. The driving force for {111} slip is attributed to high surface stresses near the intersection of low energy {111} facets in the neck region. The details of this twinning process were examined in detail using simulated trajectories, and the results reveal possible mechanisms for the nucleation and propagation of Shockley partials on consecutive planes. Deformation twinning was also observed in-situ using transmission electron microscopy, which resulted in the co-alignment of a set of the particles' {111} planes across their grain boundary and an increase in their dihedral angle. As a result, this constitutes the first detailed experimental observation of deformation twinning during nanoparticle coalescence, validating simulation results presented here and elsewhere.},
doi = {10.1016/j.actamat.2016.08.061},
journal = {Acta Materialia},
number = C,
volume = 120,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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