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Title: Cross Domain Deterrence: Livermore Technical Report, 2014-2016

Abstract

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is an original collaborator on the project titled “Deterring Complex Threats: The Effects of Asymmetry, Interdependence, and Multi-polarity on International Strategy,” (CDD Project) led by the UC Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation at UCSD under PIs Jon Lindsay and Erik Gartzke , and funded through the DoD Minerva Research Initiative. In addition to participating in workshops and facilitating interaction among UC social scientists, LLNL is leading the computational modeling effort and assisting with empirical case studies to probe the viability of analytic, modeling and data analysis concepts. This report summarizes LLNL work on the CDD Project to date, primarily in Project Years 1-2, corresponding to Federal fiscal year 2015. LLNL brings two unique domains of expertise to bear on this Project: (1) access to scientific expertise on the technical dimensions of emerging threat technology, and (2) high performance computing (HPC) expertise, required for analyzing the complexity of bargaining interactions in the envisioned threat models. In addition, we have a small group of researchers trained as social scientists who are intimately familiar with the International Relations research. We find that pairing simulation scientists, who are typically trained in computer science, with domain experts, social scientistsmore » in this case, is the most effective route to developing powerful new simulation tools capable of representing domain concepts accurately and answering challenging questions in the field.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1332466
Report Number(s):
LLNL-TR-700041
DOE Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Barnes, Peter D., Bahney, Ben, Matarazzo, Celeste, Markey, Michael, and Pearl, Jonathan. Cross Domain Deterrence: Livermore Technical Report, 2014-2016. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1332466.
Barnes, Peter D., Bahney, Ben, Matarazzo, Celeste, Markey, Michael, & Pearl, Jonathan. Cross Domain Deterrence: Livermore Technical Report, 2014-2016. United States. doi:10.2172/1332466.
Barnes, Peter D., Bahney, Ben, Matarazzo, Celeste, Markey, Michael, and Pearl, Jonathan. Wed . "Cross Domain Deterrence: Livermore Technical Report, 2014-2016". United States. doi:10.2172/1332466. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1332466.
@article{osti_1332466,
title = {Cross Domain Deterrence: Livermore Technical Report, 2014-2016},
author = {Barnes, Peter D. and Bahney, Ben and Matarazzo, Celeste and Markey, Michael and Pearl, Jonathan},
abstractNote = {Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is an original collaborator on the project titled “Deterring Complex Threats: The Effects of Asymmetry, Interdependence, and Multi-polarity on International Strategy,” (CDD Project) led by the UC Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation at UCSD under PIs Jon Lindsay and Erik Gartzke , and funded through the DoD Minerva Research Initiative. In addition to participating in workshops and facilitating interaction among UC social scientists, LLNL is leading the computational modeling effort and assisting with empirical case studies to probe the viability of analytic, modeling and data analysis concepts. This report summarizes LLNL work on the CDD Project to date, primarily in Project Years 1-2, corresponding to Federal fiscal year 2015. LLNL brings two unique domains of expertise to bear on this Project: (1) access to scientific expertise on the technical dimensions of emerging threat technology, and (2) high performance computing (HPC) expertise, required for analyzing the complexity of bargaining interactions in the envisioned threat models. In addition, we have a small group of researchers trained as social scientists who are intimately familiar with the International Relations research. We find that pairing simulation scientists, who are typically trained in computer science, with domain experts, social scientists in this case, is the most effective route to developing powerful new simulation tools capable of representing domain concepts accurately and answering challenging questions in the field.},
doi = {10.2172/1332466},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 03 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Aug 03 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

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