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Title: High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV40 Requirements

Abstract

TIAX has developed long-life lithium-ion cells that can meet and exceed the energy and power targets (200Wh/kg and 800W/kg pulse power) set out by DOE for PHEV40 batteries. To achieve these targets, we selected and scaled-up a high capacity version of our proprietary high energy and high power CAM-7® cathode material. We paired the cathode with a blended anode containing Si-based anode material capable of delivering high capacity and long life. Furthermore, we optimized the anode blend composition, cathode and anode electrode design, and selected binder and electrolyte compositions to achieve not only the best performance, but also long life. By implementing CAM-7 with a Si-based blended anode, we built and tested prototype 18650 cells that delivered measured specific energy of 198Wh/kg total energy and 845W/kg at 10% SOC (projected to 220Wh/kg in state-of-the-art 18650 cell hardware and 250Wh/kg in 15Ah pouch cells). These program demonstration cells achieved 90% capacity retention after 500 cycles in on-going cycle life testing. Moreover, we also tested the baseline CAM-7/graphite system in 18650 cells showing that 70% capacity retention can be achieved after ~4000 cycles (20 months of on-going testing). Ultimately, by simultaneously meeting the PHEV40 power and energy targets and providing long life,more » we have developed a Li-ion battery system that is smaller, lighter, and less expensive than current state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
TIAX LLC, Lexington, MA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1332281
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006452
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE

Citation Formats

Rempel, Jane. High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV40 Requirements. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1332281.
Rempel, Jane. High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV40 Requirements. United States. doi:10.2172/1332281.
Rempel, Jane. 2016. "High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV40 Requirements". United States. doi:10.2172/1332281. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1332281.
@article{osti_1332281,
title = {High Energy High Power Battery Exceeding PHEV40 Requirements},
author = {Rempel, Jane},
abstractNote = {TIAX has developed long-life lithium-ion cells that can meet and exceed the energy and power targets (200Wh/kg and 800W/kg pulse power) set out by DOE for PHEV40 batteries. To achieve these targets, we selected and scaled-up a high capacity version of our proprietary high energy and high power CAM-7® cathode material. We paired the cathode with a blended anode containing Si-based anode material capable of delivering high capacity and long life. Furthermore, we optimized the anode blend composition, cathode and anode electrode design, and selected binder and electrolyte compositions to achieve not only the best performance, but also long life. By implementing CAM-7 with a Si-based blended anode, we built and tested prototype 18650 cells that delivered measured specific energy of 198Wh/kg total energy and 845W/kg at 10% SOC (projected to 220Wh/kg in state-of-the-art 18650 cell hardware and 250Wh/kg in 15Ah pouch cells). These program demonstration cells achieved 90% capacity retention after 500 cycles in on-going cycle life testing. Moreover, we also tested the baseline CAM-7/graphite system in 18650 cells showing that 70% capacity retention can be achieved after ~4000 cycles (20 months of on-going testing). Ultimately, by simultaneously meeting the PHEV40 power and energy targets and providing long life, we have developed a Li-ion battery system that is smaller, lighter, and less expensive than current state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries.},
doi = {10.2172/1332281},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 3
}

Technical Report:

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  • In light of power requirements for search missions, the rechargeable-battery and fuel-cell technologies that are expected to be available for these missions are identified, and areas of technology development that will be required for each energy-storage system are indicated. The general conclusions are that the nickel-cadmium and nickel-hydrogen battery systems will be able to satisfy the space power needs through the early 1990s, after which a significantly higher-energy-density system will be required, particularly for geosynchronous and mid-altitude orbit missions. The sodium-sulfur battery is the only system projected to meet the requirements of the most power-intensive missions that are expected tomore » operate in higher orbits by the mid-1990s. For low-earth-orbit missions the nickel-hydrogen battery system is expected to provide the required power levels, except in situations where very high peak-power levels are required. The hydrogen-oxygen regenerative fuel cell is best suited to satisfying the high peak power needs in large power systems, but must undergo significant development to obtain the needed system life.« less
  • Near the end of FY 1994, DOE provided funding and guidance to INEL for two separate but closely related tasks involving high power energy storage technology. One task was intended to develop and refine application-specific test procedures appropriate to high power energy storage devices for potential use in hybrid vehicles, including batteries, ultracapacitors, flywheels, and similar devices. The second task was intended to characterize the high power capabilities of presently available battery technologies, as well as eventually to evaluate the potential high power capabilities of advanced battery technologies such as those being developed by the USABC. Since the evaluation ofmore » such technologies is necessarily dependent to some extent on the availability of appropriate test methods, these two tasks have been closely coordinated. This report is intended to summarize the activities and results for both tasks accomplished during FY-1995.« less
  • It was requested that the General Electric Company furnish a complete Gemini fuel cell battery with canister and all associated auxiliary equipment and all personnel and facilities required to accomplish a 1000-hour operational test under conditions which simulate the mission power requirements of the Air Force's Manned Orbiting Laboratory (MOL). The objective of this program was to test a Gemini Fuel cell battery and to obtain and evaluate data on its performance throughout the continuous operational test. A Gemini fuel cell battery, consisting of three individual 32-cell modules, was tested in accordance with a test plan approved by the Airmore » Force Aero Propulsion Laboratory. The Gemini production fuel cell battery successfully met all requirements of the test plan for the 1000-hour period. Complete MOL power requirements were successfully met for 810 hours (34 days) following which the peak powers were reduced in accordance with the test plan to maintain a 25-volt output. The test confirmed that Gemini production hardware is capable of satisfying the 30-day MOL mission requirements and provides the growth capability to serve missions up to and beyond 1000 hours duration.« less