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Title: Integrated Glass Coating Manufacturing Line

Abstract

This project aims to enable US module manufacturers to coat glass with Enki’s state of the art tunable functionalized AR coatings at the lowest possible cost and highest possible performance by encapsulating Enki’s coating process in an integrated tool that facilitates effective process improvement through metrology and data analysis for greater quality and performance while reducing footprint, operating and capital costs. The Phase 1 objective was a fully designed manufacturing line, including fully specified equipment ready for issue of purchase requisitions; a detailed economic justification based on market prices at the end of Phase 1 and projected manufacturing costs and a detailed deployment plan for the equipment.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Enki Technology Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Enki Technology Inc., San Jose, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1332124
Report Number(s):
DOE-ENKI-0002
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006810
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Manufacturing

Citation Formats

Brophy, Brenor. Integrated Glass Coating Manufacturing Line. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.2172/1332124.
Brophy, Brenor. Integrated Glass Coating Manufacturing Line. United States. doi:10.2172/1332124.
Brophy, Brenor. Wed . "Integrated Glass Coating Manufacturing Line". United States. doi:10.2172/1332124. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1332124.
@article{osti_1332124,
title = {Integrated Glass Coating Manufacturing Line},
author = {Brophy, Brenor},
abstractNote = {This project aims to enable US module manufacturers to coat glass with Enki’s state of the art tunable functionalized AR coatings at the lowest possible cost and highest possible performance by encapsulating Enki’s coating process in an integrated tool that facilitates effective process improvement through metrology and data analysis for greater quality and performance while reducing footprint, operating and capital costs. The Phase 1 objective was a fully designed manufacturing line, including fully specified equipment ready for issue of purchase requisitions; a detailed economic justification based on market prices at the end of Phase 1 and projected manufacturing costs and a detailed deployment plan for the equipment.},
doi = {10.2172/1332124},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Sep 30 00:00:00 EDT 2015},
month = {Wed Sep 30 00:00:00 EDT 2015}
}

Technical Report:

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