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Title: A Case for Radio Galaxies as the Sources of IceCube's Astrophysical Neutrino Flux

Abstract

Here, we present an argument that radio galaxies (active galaxies with mis-aligned jets) are likely to be the primary sources of the high-energy astrophysical neutrinos observed by IceCube. In particular, if the gamma-ray emission observed from radio galaxies is generated through the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with gas, these interactions can also produce a population of neutrinos with a flux and spectral shape similar to that measured by IceCube. We present a simple physical model in which high-energy cosmic rays are confined within the volumes of radio galaxies, where they interact with gas to generate the observed diffuse fluxes of neutrinos and gamma rays. In addition to simultaneously accounting for the observations of Fermi and IceCube, radio galaxies in this model also represent an attractive class of sources for the highest energy cosmic rays.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Univ. of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1331784
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-PUB-16-178-A; arXiv:1605.06504
Journal ID: ISSN 1475-7516; 1464786
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2016; Journal ID: ISSN 1475-7516
Publisher:
Institute of Physics (IOP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; neutrino astronomy; active galactic nuclei; ultra high energy photons and neutrinos

Citation Formats

Hooper, Dan. A Case for Radio Galaxies as the Sources of IceCube's Astrophysical Neutrino Flux. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2016/09/002.
Hooper, Dan. A Case for Radio Galaxies as the Sources of IceCube's Astrophysical Neutrino Flux. United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2016/09/002.
Hooper, Dan. 2016. "A Case for Radio Galaxies as the Sources of IceCube's Astrophysical Neutrino Flux". United States. doi:10.1088/1475-7516/2016/09/002. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1331784.
@article{osti_1331784,
title = {A Case for Radio Galaxies as the Sources of IceCube's Astrophysical Neutrino Flux},
author = {Hooper, Dan},
abstractNote = {Here, we present an argument that radio galaxies (active galaxies with mis-aligned jets) are likely to be the primary sources of the high-energy astrophysical neutrinos observed by IceCube. In particular, if the gamma-ray emission observed from radio galaxies is generated through the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with gas, these interactions can also produce a population of neutrinos with a flux and spectral shape similar to that measured by IceCube. We present a simple physical model in which high-energy cosmic rays are confined within the volumes of radio galaxies, where they interact with gas to generate the observed diffuse fluxes of neutrinos and gamma rays. In addition to simultaneously accounting for the observations of Fermi and IceCube, radio galaxies in this model also represent an attractive class of sources for the highest energy cosmic rays.},
doi = {10.1088/1475-7516/2016/09/002},
journal = {Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics},
number = ,
volume = 2016,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3works
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