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Title: A framework for WRF to WRF-IBM grid nesting to enable multiscale simulations

Abstract

With advances in computational power, mesoscale models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are often pushed to higher resolutions. As the model’s horizontal resolution is refined, the maximum resolved terrain slope will increase. Because WRF uses a terrain-following coordinate, this increase in resolved terrain slopes introduces additional grid skewness. At high resolutions and over complex terrain, this grid skewness can introduce large numerical errors that require methods, such as the immersed boundary method, to keep the model accurate and stable. Our implementation of the immersed boundary method in the WRF model, WRF-IBM, has proven effective at microscale simulations over complex terrain. WRF-IBM uses a non-conforming grid that extends beneath the model’s terrain. Boundary conditions at the immersed boundary, the terrain, are enforced by introducing a body force term to the governing equations at points directly beneath the immersed boundary. Nesting between a WRF parent grid and a WRF-IBM child grid requires a new framework for initialization and forcing of the child WRF-IBM grid. This framework will enable concurrent multi-scale simulations within the WRF model, improving the accuracy of high-resolution simulations and enabling simulations across a wide range of scales.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1331464
Report Number(s):
LLNL-SR-704084
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Wiersema, David John, Lundquist, Katherine A., and Chow, Fotini Katapodes. A framework for WRF to WRF-IBM grid nesting to enable multiscale simulations. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1331464.
Wiersema, David John, Lundquist, Katherine A., & Chow, Fotini Katapodes. A framework for WRF to WRF-IBM grid nesting to enable multiscale simulations. United States. doi:10.2172/1331464.
Wiersema, David John, Lundquist, Katherine A., and Chow, Fotini Katapodes. 2016. "A framework for WRF to WRF-IBM grid nesting to enable multiscale simulations". United States. doi:10.2172/1331464. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1331464.
@article{osti_1331464,
title = {A framework for WRF to WRF-IBM grid nesting to enable multiscale simulations},
author = {Wiersema, David John and Lundquist, Katherine A. and Chow, Fotini Katapodes},
abstractNote = {With advances in computational power, mesoscale models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are often pushed to higher resolutions. As the model’s horizontal resolution is refined, the maximum resolved terrain slope will increase. Because WRF uses a terrain-following coordinate, this increase in resolved terrain slopes introduces additional grid skewness. At high resolutions and over complex terrain, this grid skewness can introduce large numerical errors that require methods, such as the immersed boundary method, to keep the model accurate and stable. Our implementation of the immersed boundary method in the WRF model, WRF-IBM, has proven effective at microscale simulations over complex terrain. WRF-IBM uses a non-conforming grid that extends beneath the model’s terrain. Boundary conditions at the immersed boundary, the terrain, are enforced by introducing a body force term to the governing equations at points directly beneath the immersed boundary. Nesting between a WRF parent grid and a WRF-IBM child grid requires a new framework for initialization and forcing of the child WRF-IBM grid. This framework will enable concurrent multi-scale simulations within the WRF model, improving the accuracy of high-resolution simulations and enabling simulations across a wide range of scales.},
doi = {10.2172/1331464},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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