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Title: Development and Evaluation of Speed Harmonization using Optimal Control Theory: A Simulation-Based Case Study at a Speed Reduction Zone

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1]
  1. University of Virginia
  2. ORNL
  3. New Jersey Institute of Technology
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). National Transportation Research Center (NTRC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1331102
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2017 TRB Annual Meeting, Washington DC, DC, USA, 20170108, 20170112
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Connected and automated vehicles; speed harmonization; optimal control

Citation Formats

Hong, Seongah, Malikopoulos, Andreas, Lee, Joyoung, and Brian, Park. Development and Evaluation of Speed Harmonization using Optimal Control Theory: A Simulation-Based Case Study at a Speed Reduction Zone. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Hong, Seongah, Malikopoulos, Andreas, Lee, Joyoung, & Brian, Park. Development and Evaluation of Speed Harmonization using Optimal Control Theory: A Simulation-Based Case Study at a Speed Reduction Zone. United States.
Hong, Seongah, Malikopoulos, Andreas, Lee, Joyoung, and Brian, Park. Sun . "Development and Evaluation of Speed Harmonization using Optimal Control Theory: A Simulation-Based Case Study at a Speed Reduction Zone". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1331102,
title = {Development and Evaluation of Speed Harmonization using Optimal Control Theory: A Simulation-Based Case Study at a Speed Reduction Zone},
author = {Hong, Seongah and Malikopoulos, Andreas and Lee, Joyoung and Brian, Park},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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