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Title: Laser-assisted focused He + ion beam induced etching with and without XeF 2 gas assist

Abstract

Focused helium ion (He +) milling has been demonstrated as a high-resolution nanopatterning technique; however, it can be limited by its low sputter yield as well as the introduction of undesired subsurface damage. Here, we introduce pulsed laser- and gas-assisted processes to enhance the material removal rate and patterning fidelity. A pulsed laser-assisted He+ milling process is shown to enable high-resolution milling of titanium while reducing subsurface damage in situ. Gas-assisted focused ion beam induced etching (FIBIE) of Ti is also demonstrated in which the XeF 2 precursor provides a chemical assist for enhanced material removal rate. In conclusion, a pulsed laser-assisted and gas-assisted FIBIE process is shown to increase the etch yield by ~9× relative to the pure He+ sputtering process. These He + induced nanopatterning techniques improve material removal rate, in comparison to standard He + sputtering, while simultaneously decreasing subsurface damage, thus extending the applicability of the He + probe as a nanopattering tool.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Intel Corp., Santa Clara, CA (United States)
  4. Waviks Inc., Dallas, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1331091
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 8; Journal Issue: 42; Journal ID: ISSN 1944-8244
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; focused ion beam induced etching; helium ion; laser-assisted etching; nanofabrication; titanium; XeF2

Citation Formats

Stanford, Michael G., Mahady, Kyle, Lewis, Brett B., Fowlkes, Jason D., Tan, Shida, Livengood, Richard, Magel, Gregory A., Moore, Thomas M., and Rack, Philip D.. Laser-assisted focused He+ ion beam induced etching with and without XeF2 gas assist. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acsami.6b09758.
Stanford, Michael G., Mahady, Kyle, Lewis, Brett B., Fowlkes, Jason D., Tan, Shida, Livengood, Richard, Magel, Gregory A., Moore, Thomas M., & Rack, Philip D.. Laser-assisted focused He+ ion beam induced etching with and without XeF2 gas assist. United States. doi:10.1021/acsami.6b09758.
Stanford, Michael G., Mahady, Kyle, Lewis, Brett B., Fowlkes, Jason D., Tan, Shida, Livengood, Richard, Magel, Gregory A., Moore, Thomas M., and Rack, Philip D.. 2016. "Laser-assisted focused He+ ion beam induced etching with and without XeF2 gas assist". United States. doi:10.1021/acsami.6b09758. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1331091.
@article{osti_1331091,
title = {Laser-assisted focused He+ ion beam induced etching with and without XeF2 gas assist},
author = {Stanford, Michael G. and Mahady, Kyle and Lewis, Brett B. and Fowlkes, Jason D. and Tan, Shida and Livengood, Richard and Magel, Gregory A. and Moore, Thomas M. and Rack, Philip D.},
abstractNote = {Focused helium ion (He+) milling has been demonstrated as a high-resolution nanopatterning technique; however, it can be limited by its low sputter yield as well as the introduction of undesired subsurface damage. Here, we introduce pulsed laser- and gas-assisted processes to enhance the material removal rate and patterning fidelity. A pulsed laser-assisted He+ milling process is shown to enable high-resolution milling of titanium while reducing subsurface damage in situ. Gas-assisted focused ion beam induced etching (FIBIE) of Ti is also demonstrated in which the XeF2 precursor provides a chemical assist for enhanced material removal rate. In conclusion, a pulsed laser-assisted and gas-assisted FIBIE process is shown to increase the etch yield by ~9× relative to the pure He+ sputtering process. These He+ induced nanopatterning techniques improve material removal rate, in comparison to standard He+ sputtering, while simultaneously decreasing subsurface damage, thus extending the applicability of the He+ probe as a nanopattering tool.},
doi = {10.1021/acsami.6b09758},
journal = {ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces},
number = 42,
volume = 8,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 2works
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