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Title: M3FT-16OR020202112 - Report on viability of hydrothermal corrosion resistant SiC/SiC Joint development

Abstract

Hydrothermal corrosion of four types of the silicon carbide (SiC) to SiC plate joints were investigated under PWR and BWR relevant chemical conditions without irradiation. The joints were formed by metal diffusion bonding using molybdenum or titanium interlayer, reaction sintering using Ti-Si-C system, and SiC nanopowder sintering. Most of the formed joints withstood the corrosion tests for five weeks. The recession of the SiC substrates was limited. Based on the recession rate of the bonding layers, it was concluded that all the joints except for the molybdenum diffusion bond are promising under the reducing activity environments. The SiC nanopowder sintered joint was the most corrosion tolerant under the oxidizing activity environment among the four joints.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Temperature Materials Lab. (HTML)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1331090
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2016/274
AF5810000; NEAF278; TRN: US1700485
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; SILICON CARBIDES; MOLYBDENUM; SILICON; TITANIUM; CARBON; CORROSION; JOINTS; BONDING; CORROSION RESISTANCE; NANOSTRUCTURES; POWDERS; SINTERING; DIFFUSION; SERVICE LIFE; LAYERS; PLATES; SUBSTRATES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS

Citation Formats

Katoh, Yutai, Koyanagi, Takaaki, Kiggans Jr, James O., and Terrani, Kurt A.. M3FT-16OR020202112 - Report on viability of hydrothermal corrosion resistant SiC/SiC Joint development. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1331090.
Katoh, Yutai, Koyanagi, Takaaki, Kiggans Jr, James O., & Terrani, Kurt A.. M3FT-16OR020202112 - Report on viability of hydrothermal corrosion resistant SiC/SiC Joint development. United States. doi:10.2172/1331090.
Katoh, Yutai, Koyanagi, Takaaki, Kiggans Jr, James O., and Terrani, Kurt A.. 2016. "M3FT-16OR020202112 - Report on viability of hydrothermal corrosion resistant SiC/SiC Joint development". United States. doi:10.2172/1331090. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1331090.
@article{osti_1331090,
title = {M3FT-16OR020202112 - Report on viability of hydrothermal corrosion resistant SiC/SiC Joint development},
author = {Katoh, Yutai and Koyanagi, Takaaki and Kiggans Jr, James O. and Terrani, Kurt A.},
abstractNote = {Hydrothermal corrosion of four types of the silicon carbide (SiC) to SiC plate joints were investigated under PWR and BWR relevant chemical conditions without irradiation. The joints were formed by metal diffusion bonding using molybdenum or titanium interlayer, reaction sintering using Ti-Si-C system, and SiC nanopowder sintering. Most of the formed joints withstood the corrosion tests for five weeks. The recession of the SiC substrates was limited. Based on the recession rate of the bonding layers, it was concluded that all the joints except for the molybdenum diffusion bond are promising under the reducing activity environments. The SiC nanopowder sintered joint was the most corrosion tolerant under the oxidizing activity environment among the four joints.},
doi = {10.2172/1331090},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Technical Report:

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