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Title: EPA GHG certification of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles: Development of road grade profiles representative of US controlled access highways

Abstract

In collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has conducted a national analysis of road grade characteristics experienced by U.S. medium- and heavy-duty trucks on controlled access highways. These characteristics have been developed using TomTom's commercially available street map and road grade database. Using the TomTom national road grade database, national statistics on road grade and hill distances were generated for the U.S. network of controlled access highways. These statistical distributions were then weighted using data provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for activity of medium- and heavy-duty trucks on controlled access highways. Here, the national activity-weighted road grade and hill distance distributions were then used as targets for development of a handful of sample grade profiles potentially to be used in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Greenhouse Gas Emissions Model certification tool as well as in dynamometer testing of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles and their powertrains.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1330938
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5400-66187
Journal ID: ISSN 1946-3928
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
SAE International Journal of Commercial Vehicles
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1946-3928
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; US Environmental Protection Agency; EPA; drive cycles; road grade; greenhouse gas regulation; heavy-duty vehicles

Citation Formats

Wood, Eric, Duran, Adam, and Kelly, Kenneth. EPA GHG certification of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles: Development of road grade profiles representative of US controlled access highways. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.4271/2016-01-8017.
Wood, Eric, Duran, Adam, & Kelly, Kenneth. EPA GHG certification of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles: Development of road grade profiles representative of US controlled access highways. United States. doi:10.4271/2016-01-8017.
Wood, Eric, Duran, Adam, and Kelly, Kenneth. 2016. "EPA GHG certification of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles: Development of road grade profiles representative of US controlled access highways". United States. doi:10.4271/2016-01-8017. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1330938.
@article{osti_1330938,
title = {EPA GHG certification of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles: Development of road grade profiles representative of US controlled access highways},
author = {Wood, Eric and Duran, Adam and Kelly, Kenneth},
abstractNote = {In collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has conducted a national analysis of road grade characteristics experienced by U.S. medium- and heavy-duty trucks on controlled access highways. These characteristics have been developed using TomTom's commercially available street map and road grade database. Using the TomTom national road grade database, national statistics on road grade and hill distances were generated for the U.S. network of controlled access highways. These statistical distributions were then weighted using data provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for activity of medium- and heavy-duty trucks on controlled access highways. Here, the national activity-weighted road grade and hill distance distributions were then used as targets for development of a handful of sample grade profiles potentially to be used in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Greenhouse Gas Emissions Model certification tool as well as in dynamometer testing of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles and their powertrains.},
doi = {10.4271/2016-01-8017},
journal = {SAE International Journal of Commercial Vehicles},
number = 2,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
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