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Title: Hugoniot model for Si from L140

Abstract

In this document, we provide the Hugoniot for silicon from LEOS table L140. The Hugoniot pressures are supplied for temperatures between 298.0 and 1:16 10 9 Kelvin and densities of 2.329 and 10.07 g/cc. This EOS model was developed by the quotidian EOS methodology, which is a widely used and robust method for producing tabular EOS data.[1, 2] Table 1 lists the included quantities and units of those data.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1330749
Report Number(s):
LLNL-TR-703359
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Whitley, H. D., and Wu, C. J.. Hugoniot model for Si from L140. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1330749.
Whitley, H. D., & Wu, C. J.. Hugoniot model for Si from L140. United States. doi:10.2172/1330749.
Whitley, H. D., and Wu, C. J.. 2016. "Hugoniot model for Si from L140". United States. doi:10.2172/1330749. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1330749.
@article{osti_1330749,
title = {Hugoniot model for Si from L140},
author = {Whitley, H. D. and Wu, C. J.},
abstractNote = {In this document, we provide the Hugoniot for silicon from LEOS table L140. The Hugoniot pressures are supplied for temperatures between 298.0 and 1:16 109 Kelvin and densities of 2.329 and 10.07 g/cc. This EOS model was developed by the quotidian EOS methodology, which is a widely used and robust method for producing tabular EOS data.[1, 2] Table 1 lists the included quantities and units of those data.},
doi = {10.2172/1330749},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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