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Title: Ultra-Trace and Vapor Detection of Explosives and Narcotics Finalist for R&D 100 Award

Abstract

An instrument more sensitive than a canine’s nose identifies explosives and narcotics vapors in real time and at levels previously undetectable than any other sampling technology. The instrument is one among five PNNL-developed technologies in the running for an R&D 100 Award. Known as VP-IDENT, the tool coupled with a mass spectrometer, is ideal for aviation security, cargo screening, and broader counter-terrorism and national security activities where discovering dangerous substances is of utmost importance. Listen as researcher Robert Ewing explains.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
PNNL (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1330347
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; VAPOR DETECTION; LOW VAPORS; COMMERCIAL MASS SPECTROMETER; IONIZATION; EXPLOSIVE VAPORS

Citation Formats

Ewing, Robert. Ultra-Trace and Vapor Detection of Explosives and Narcotics Finalist for R&D 100 Award. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Ewing, Robert. Ultra-Trace and Vapor Detection of Explosives and Narcotics Finalist for R&D 100 Award. United States.
Ewing, Robert. 2016. "Ultra-Trace and Vapor Detection of Explosives and Narcotics Finalist for R&D 100 Award". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1330347.
@article{osti_1330347,
title = {Ultra-Trace and Vapor Detection of Explosives and Narcotics Finalist for R&D 100 Award},
author = {Ewing, Robert},
abstractNote = {An instrument more sensitive than a canine’s nose identifies explosives and narcotics vapors in real time and at levels previously undetectable than any other sampling technology. The instrument is one among five PNNL-developed technologies in the running for an R&D 100 Award. Known as VP-IDENT, the tool coupled with a mass spectrometer, is ideal for aviation security, cargo screening, and broader counter-terrorism and national security activities where discovering dangerous substances is of utmost importance. Listen as researcher Robert Ewing explains.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
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  • This video was presented at the National Building Museum's 2010 Honor Award: A Salute to Civic Innovators.