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Title: Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials: Report from an International Workshop on the Role of Alternative Testing Strategies for Advancement: Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials

Abstract

The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) has a history of bringing thought leadership to topics of emerging risk. In September 2014, the SRA Emerging Nanoscale Materials Specialty Group convened an international workshop to examine the use of alternative testing strategies (ATS) for manufactured nanomaterials (NM) from a risk analysis perspective. Experts in NM environmental health and safety, human health, ecotoxicology, regulatory compliance, risk analysis, and ATS evaluated and discussed the state of the science for in vitro and other alternatives to traditional toxicology testing for NM. Based on this review, experts recommended immediate and near-term actions that would advance ATS use in NM risk assessment. Three focal areas-human health, ecological health, and exposure considerations-shaped deliberations about information needs, priorities, and the next steps required to increase confidence in and use of ATS in NM risk assessment. The deliberations revealed that ATS are now being used for screening, and that, in the near term, ATS could be developed for use in read-across or categorization decision making within certain regulatory frameworks. Participants recognized that leadership is required from within the scientific community to address basic challenges, including standardizing materials, protocols, techniques and reporting, and designing experiments relevant to real-world conditions, as wellmore » as coordination and sharing of large-scale collaborations and data. Experts agreed that it will be critical to include experimental parameters that can support the development of adverse outcome pathways. Numerous other insightful ideas for investment in ATS emerged throughout the discussions and are further highlighted in this article.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [3];  [12];  [13];  [14];  [15];  [16]
  1. Vireo Advisors, Boston MA USA
  2. Compass RM, Vancouver CA USA
  3. PETA International Science Consortium Ltd, London UK
  4. Center for the Environmental Implications of NanoTechnology, Duke University, Durham NC USA
  5. TERA, Cincinnati OH USA
  6. Health Canada, Ottawa Canada
  7. UC Santa Barbara, Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, ERI, and UC CEIN, University of California, Santa Barbara CA USA
  8. U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Environmental Laboratory, Vicksburg MS USA
  9. Independent, Somerville MA USA
  10. Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, Argonne IL USA
  11. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Transportation and Air Quality, Ann Arbor MI USA
  12. Alberta Ingenuity Labs, Edmonton Alberta Canada
  13. John Muir Building Gait 1 Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh Scotland UK
  14. Environment Canada, Gatineau QC Canada
  15. ICF International, Durham NC USA
  16. RH White Consultants, Silver Spring MD USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Science Foundation (NSF); PETA International Science Consortium Ltd.; Department of Defense - U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
OSTI Identifier:
1330093
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Risk Analysis; Journal Volume: 36; Journal Issue: 8
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; alternative testing strategies; expert workshop; nanomaterials; nanotoxicology; risk analysis

Citation Formats

Shatkin, J. A., Ong, Kimberly J., Beaudrie, Christian, Clippinger, Amy J., Hendren, Christine Ogilvie, Haber, Lynne T., Hill, Myriam, Holden, Patricia, Kennedy, Alan J., Kim, Baram, MacDonell, Margaret, Powers, Christina M., Sharma, Monita, Sheremeta, Lorraine, Stone, Vicki, Sultan, Yasir, Turley, Audrey, and White, Ronald H. Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials: Report from an International Workshop on the Role of Alternative Testing Strategies for Advancement: Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1111/risa.12683.
Shatkin, J. A., Ong, Kimberly J., Beaudrie, Christian, Clippinger, Amy J., Hendren, Christine Ogilvie, Haber, Lynne T., Hill, Myriam, Holden, Patricia, Kennedy, Alan J., Kim, Baram, MacDonell, Margaret, Powers, Christina M., Sharma, Monita, Sheremeta, Lorraine, Stone, Vicki, Sultan, Yasir, Turley, Audrey, & White, Ronald H. Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials: Report from an International Workshop on the Role of Alternative Testing Strategies for Advancement: Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials. United States. doi:10.1111/risa.12683.
Shatkin, J. A., Ong, Kimberly J., Beaudrie, Christian, Clippinger, Amy J., Hendren, Christine Ogilvie, Haber, Lynne T., Hill, Myriam, Holden, Patricia, Kennedy, Alan J., Kim, Baram, MacDonell, Margaret, Powers, Christina M., Sharma, Monita, Sheremeta, Lorraine, Stone, Vicki, Sultan, Yasir, Turley, Audrey, and White, Ronald H. Mon . "Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials: Report from an International Workshop on the Role of Alternative Testing Strategies for Advancement: Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials". United States. doi:10.1111/risa.12683.
@article{osti_1330093,
title = {Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials: Report from an International Workshop on the Role of Alternative Testing Strategies for Advancement: Advancing Risk Analysis for Nanoscale Materials},
author = {Shatkin, J. A. and Ong, Kimberly J. and Beaudrie, Christian and Clippinger, Amy J. and Hendren, Christine Ogilvie and Haber, Lynne T. and Hill, Myriam and Holden, Patricia and Kennedy, Alan J. and Kim, Baram and MacDonell, Margaret and Powers, Christina M. and Sharma, Monita and Sheremeta, Lorraine and Stone, Vicki and Sultan, Yasir and Turley, Audrey and White, Ronald H.},
abstractNote = {The Society for Risk Analysis (SRA) has a history of bringing thought leadership to topics of emerging risk. In September 2014, the SRA Emerging Nanoscale Materials Specialty Group convened an international workshop to examine the use of alternative testing strategies (ATS) for manufactured nanomaterials (NM) from a risk analysis perspective. Experts in NM environmental health and safety, human health, ecotoxicology, regulatory compliance, risk analysis, and ATS evaluated and discussed the state of the science for in vitro and other alternatives to traditional toxicology testing for NM. Based on this review, experts recommended immediate and near-term actions that would advance ATS use in NM risk assessment. Three focal areas-human health, ecological health, and exposure considerations-shaped deliberations about information needs, priorities, and the next steps required to increase confidence in and use of ATS in NM risk assessment. The deliberations revealed that ATS are now being used for screening, and that, in the near term, ATS could be developed for use in read-across or categorization decision making within certain regulatory frameworks. Participants recognized that leadership is required from within the scientific community to address basic challenges, including standardizing materials, protocols, techniques and reporting, and designing experiments relevant to real-world conditions, as well as coordination and sharing of large-scale collaborations and data. Experts agreed that it will be critical to include experimental parameters that can support the development of adverse outcome pathways. Numerous other insightful ideas for investment in ATS emerged throughout the discussions and are further highlighted in this article.},
doi = {10.1111/risa.12683},
journal = {Risk Analysis},
number = 8,
volume = 36,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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