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Title: A PROTOTYPE INSTRUMENT FOR IN SITU LUMINESCENCE DATING OF SEDIMENTS ON MARS

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
  2. NON LANL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1329828
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-07-2711
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 7TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON MARS ; 200707 ; PASADENA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

BLAIR, MICHAEL W., KALCHGRUBER, REGINA, MCKEEVER, STEPHEN W., and BENTON, ERIC R. A PROTOTYPE INSTRUMENT FOR IN SITU LUMINESCENCE DATING OF SEDIMENTS ON MARS. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
BLAIR, MICHAEL W., KALCHGRUBER, REGINA, MCKEEVER, STEPHEN W., & BENTON, ERIC R. A PROTOTYPE INSTRUMENT FOR IN SITU LUMINESCENCE DATING OF SEDIMENTS ON MARS. United States.
BLAIR, MICHAEL W., KALCHGRUBER, REGINA, MCKEEVER, STEPHEN W., and BENTON, ERIC R. Mon . "A PROTOTYPE INSTRUMENT FOR IN SITU LUMINESCENCE DATING OF SEDIMENTS ON MARS". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1329828.
@article{osti_1329828,
title = {A PROTOTYPE INSTRUMENT FOR IN SITU LUMINESCENCE DATING OF SEDIMENTS ON MARS},
author = {BLAIR, MICHAEL W. and KALCHGRUBER, REGINA and MCKEEVER, STEPHEN W. and BENTON, ERIC R.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Mon Apr 23 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • Although not recognized as a true geologic period on Mars, the term 'Martian Quaternary' emerged at the 2001 LPSC. The phrase helps focus attention on the fact that Mars does indeed exhibit dynamic surface processes andd geomorphic features active on time scales less than 10{sup 6} years. As on earth evolving landscapes can serve as important storehouses for paltoclimatic and paIeoenvironmental records. However, deciphering the 'Quaternary' history of Mars will require the development of 4 new set of tools that are uniquely suited to examining youthful sediments and geomorphic features.
  • Martian surface deposits, including polar deposits, represent a vast storehouse of data recording the evolution Of Mars' climate and surface environment. However, the greatest challenge to deciphering these martian geo-records is the need for absolute dating techniques, Particularly those techniques applicable to the timeframes and surface processes of the 'Martian Quaternary'. Lepper and McKeever [3,4] have proposed developing optical dating, an established terrestrial chronometric dating method based on principles eri'solid-state physics, for retnote in-situ dating oCrnartian surface seditnents.
  • Before siting a nuclear power station or a nuclear waste repository, it is necessary to establish that the area has been free of earthquake activity for a sufficient period of time. Evidence of past earthquake activity is often provided by faults in surface sediments. Age limits for fault formation can be set by obtaining the depositional ages of the sediment unit in which the fault was formed and the overlying sediment. A useful technique would be one that dating could be applied to the mineral grains that make up the sediments and that would give the time that has passedmore » since the grains were blown or washed into position. Luminescence dating techniques, of which the most well known is thermo-luminescence (TL), provide such information. This approach has been successful in dating movement on the Wasatch Fault in Utah. A combination of TL and radiocarbon dates indicated that three faulting events had occurred within the past 5000 years. 2 refs., 1 fig.« less
  • In luminescence dating of sediments, one of the most interesting tools for the determination of the annual radiation dose is Ge {gamma}-ray spectrometry. Indeed, it yields information on both the content of the radioelements K, Th, and U, and on the occurrence - in geological times - of disequilibria in the Th and U decay series. In the present work, two methodological variants of the {gamma}-spectrometric analysis were tested, which largely depend on the quality of the nuclear decay data involved: (1) a parametric calibration of the sediment measurements, and (2) the correction for the heavy spectral interference of themore » 226Ra 186.2 keV peak by 235U at 185.7 keV. The performance of these methods was examined via the analysis of three Certified Reference Materials, with the introduction of {gamma}-ray intensity data originating from ENSDF. Relevant conclusions were drawn as to the accuracy of the data and their uncertainties quoted.« less
  • The authors have designed and built the prototype of an instrument that will use fiber optic micromirror-based chemical sensors to investigate the surprising reactivity of martian soil reported by several Viking Lander Experiments in the mid 1970s. The MOx (Mars Oxidant Experiment) Instrument, which will probe the reactivity of the near-surface martian atmosphere as well as soil, utilizes an array of chemically sensitive thin films including metals, organometallics, and organic dyes to produce a pattern of reflectivity changes characteristic of the species interacting with these sensing layers. The 850-g system includes LED light sources, optical fiber light guides, silicon micromachinedmore » fixtures, a line-array CCD detector, control-and-measurement electronics, microprocessor, memory, interface, batteries, and housing. This instrument monitors real-time reflectivities from an array of {approximately}200 separate micromirrors. The unmanned Russian Mars 96 mission is slated to carry the MOx Instrument along with experiments from several other nations. The principles of the chemically sensitive micromirror upon which this instrument is based will be described and preliminary data for reactions of micromirrors with oxidant materials believed to be similar to those on Mars will be presented. The general design of the instrument, including Si micromachined components, as well as the range of coatings and the rationale for their selection, will be discussed as well.« less