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Title: CRADA/NFE-15-05779 Report: Fabrication of Large Area Printable Composite Magnets

Abstract

The technical objective of this technical collaboration phase I proposal was to fabricate large area NdFeB composite magnets at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (ORNL MDF). The goal was to distribute domestically produced isotropic and highly anisotropic high energy density magnetic particles throughout the composite structure in order to enable site specific placement of magnetic phases and minimize the generated waste associated with permanent magnet manufacturing. Big area additive manufacturing (BAAM) and magnet composite fabrication methods were used in this study. BAAM was used to fabricate 65 vol % isotropic MQP NdFeB magnets in nylon polymer matrix. BAAM magnet cylinder was sliced to two magnetic arc-shaped braces. The density of the small BAAM magnet pieces reached 4.1 g/cm 3, and the room temperature magnetic properties are: Intrinsic coercivity H ci = 8.8 kOe, Remanence B r = 4.2 kG, and energy product (BH) max = 3.7 MGOe. Also, 1.5” x 1.5” composite magnets with anisotropic MQA NdFeB magnet in a resin were also fabricated under magnetic field. The unaligned sample had a density of 3.75 g/cm 3. However, aligned sample possessed a density of 4.27 g/cm 3. The magnetic properties didn’t degrade during this process. This studymore » provides a pathway for preparing composite magnets for various magnetic applications.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1329774
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2016/603
ED2802000; CEED492; CRADA/NFE-15-05779
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Paranthaman, M. Parans. CRADA/NFE-15-05779 Report: Fabrication of Large Area Printable Composite Magnets. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1329774.
Paranthaman, M. Parans. CRADA/NFE-15-05779 Report: Fabrication of Large Area Printable Composite Magnets. United States. doi:10.2172/1329774.
Paranthaman, M. Parans. Thu . "CRADA/NFE-15-05779 Report: Fabrication of Large Area Printable Composite Magnets". United States. doi:10.2172/1329774. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1329774.
@article{osti_1329774,
title = {CRADA/NFE-15-05779 Report: Fabrication of Large Area Printable Composite Magnets},
author = {Paranthaman, M. Parans},
abstractNote = {The technical objective of this technical collaboration phase I proposal was to fabricate large area NdFeB composite magnets at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (ORNL MDF). The goal was to distribute domestically produced isotropic and highly anisotropic high energy density magnetic particles throughout the composite structure in order to enable site specific placement of magnetic phases and minimize the generated waste associated with permanent magnet manufacturing. Big area additive manufacturing (BAAM) and magnet composite fabrication methods were used in this study. BAAM was used to fabricate 65 vol % isotropic MQP NdFeB magnets in nylon polymer matrix. BAAM magnet cylinder was sliced to two magnetic arc-shaped braces. The density of the small BAAM magnet pieces reached 4.1 g/cm3, and the room temperature magnetic properties are: Intrinsic coercivity Hci = 8.8 kOe, Remanence Br = 4.2 kG, and energy product (BH)max = 3.7 MGOe. Also, 1.5” x 1.5” composite magnets with anisotropic MQA NdFeB magnet in a resin were also fabricated under magnetic field. The unaligned sample had a density of 3.75 g/cm3. However, aligned sample possessed a density of 4.27 g/cm3. The magnetic properties didn’t degrade during this process. This study provides a pathway for preparing composite magnets for various magnetic applications.},
doi = {10.2172/1329774},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 29 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Sep 29 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The technical objective of this technical collaboration phase I proposal is to fabricate net shape isotropic NdFeB bonded magnets utilizing additive manufacturing technologies at the ORNL MDF. The goal is to form complex shapes of thermoplastic and/or thermoset bonded magnets without expensive tooling and with minimal wasted material. Two additive manufacturing methods; the binder jet process; and big area additive manufacturing (BAAM) were used. Binder jetting produced magnets with the measured density of the magnet of 3.47 g/cm 3, close to 46% relative to the NdFeB single crystal density of 7.6 g/cm 3 were demonstrated. Magnetic measurements indicate that theremore » is no degradation in the magnetic properties. In addition, BAAM was used to fabricate isotropic near-net-shape NdFeB bonded magnets with magnetic and mechanical properties comparable or better than those of traditional injection molded magnets. The starting polymer magnet composite pellets consist of 65 vol% isotropic NdFeB powder and 35 vol% polyamide (Nylon-12). The density of the final BAAM magnet product reached 4.8 g/cm 3, and the room temperature magnetic properties are: Intrinsic coercivity Hci = 8.65 kOe, Remanence Br = 5.07 kG, and energy product (BH) max = 5.47 MGOe (43.50 kJ/m 3). This study provides a new pathway for preparing near-net shape bonded magnets for various magnetic applications.« less
  • Oak Ridge National Laboratory and A123 Systems, Inc. collaborated on this project to develop a better understanding, quality control procedures, and safety testing for A123 System’s nanocomposite separator (NCS) technology which is a cell based patented technology and separator. NCS demonstrated excellent performance. x3450 prismatic cells were shown to survive >8000 cycles (1C/2C rate) at room temperature with greater than 80% capacity retention with only NCS present as an alternative to conventional polyolefin. However, for a successful commercialization, the coating conditions required to provide consistent and reliable product had not been optimized and QC techniques for being able to removemore » defective material before incorporation into a cell had not been developed. The work outlined in this report addresses these latter two points. First, experiments were conducted to understand temperature profiles during the different drying stages of the NCS coating when applied to both anode and cathode. One of the more interesting discoveries of this study was the observation of the large temperature decrease experienced by the wet coating between the end of the infrared (IR) drying stage and the beginning of the exposure to the convection drying oven. This is not a desirable situation as the temperature gradient could have a deleterious effect on coating quality. Based on this and other experimental data a radiative transfer model was developed for IR heating that also included a mass transfer module for drying. This will prove invaluable for battery coating optimization especially where IR drying is being employed. A stress model was also developed that predicts that under certain drying conditions tensile stresses are formed in the coating which could lead to cracking that is sometimes observed after drying is complete. Prediction of under what conditions these stresses form is vital to improving coating quality. In addition to understanding the drying process other parameters such as slurry quality and equipment optimization were examined. Removal of particles and gels by filtering, control of viscosity by %solids and mixing adjustments, removal of trapped gas in the slurry and modification of coater speed and slot die gap were all found to be important for producing uniform and flaw-free coatings. Second, an in-line Hi-Pot testing method has been developed specifically for NCS that will enable detection of coating flaws that could lead to soft or hard electrical shorts within the cell. In this way flawed material can be rejected before incorporation into the cell thus greatly reducing the amount of scrap that is generated. Improved battery safety is an extremely important benefit of NCS. Evaluation of battery safety is usually accomplished by conducting a variety of tests including nail penetration, hot box, over charge, etc. For these tests entire batteries must be built but the resultant temperature and voltage responses reveal little about the breakdown mechanism. In this report is described a pinch test which is used to evaluate NCS quality at various stages including coated anode and cathode as well as assembled cell. Coupled with post-microscopic examination of the damaged ‘pinch point’ test data can assist in the coating optimization from an improved end-use standpoint. As a result of this work two invention disclosures, one for optimizing drying methodology and the other for an in-line system for flaw detection, have been filed. In addition, 2 papers are being written for submission to peer-reviewed journals.« less
  • The overall objective of the collaborative research performed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Dow Chemical Company under this Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA NFE-10-02991) was to develop and establish pathways to commercialize new carbon fiber precursor and conversion technology. This technology is to produce alternative polymer fiber precursor formulations as well as scaled energy-efficient advanced conversion technology to enable continuous mode conversion to obtain carbonized fibers that are technically and economically viable in industrial markets such as transportation, wind energy, infrastructure and oil drilling applications. There have been efforts in the past to produce amore » low cost carbon fiber. These attempts have to be interpreted against the backdrop of the market needs at the time, which were strictly military aircraft and high-end aerospace components. In fact, manufacturing costs have been reduced from those days to current practice, where both process optimization and volume production have enabled carbon fiber to become available at prices below $20/lb. However, the requirements of the lucrative aerospace market limits further price reductions from current practice. This approach is different because specific industrial applications are targeted, most specifically wind turbine blade and light vehicle transportation, where aircraft grade carbon fiber is not required. As a result, researchers are free to adjust both manufacturing process and precursor chemistry to meet the relaxed physical specifications at a lower cost. This report documents the approach and findings of this cooperative research in alternative precursors and advanced conversion for production of cost-effective carbon fiber for energy missions. Due to export control, proprietary restrictions, and CRADA protected data considerations, specific design details and processing parameters are not included in this report.« less
  • The Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) Cyber Security for Energy Delivery Systems (CSEDS) industry led program (DE-FOA-0000359) entitled "Innovation for Increasing Cyber Security for Energy Delivery Systems (12CSEDS)," awarded a contract to Sypris Electronics LLC to develop a Cryptographic Key Management System for the smart grid (Scalable Key Management Solutions for Critical Infrastructure Protection). Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sypris Electronics, LLC as a result of that award entered into a CRADA (NFE-11-03562) between ORNL and Sypris Electronics, LLC. ORNL provided its Cyber Security Econometrics System (CSES) as a tool to be modifiedmore » and used as a metric to address risks and vulnerabilities in the management of cryptographic keys within the Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) domain of the electric sector. ORNL concentrated our analysis on the AMI domain of which the National Electric Sector Cyber security Organization Resource (NESCOR) Working Group 1 (WG1) has documented 29 failure scenarios. The computational infrastructure of this metric involves system stakeholders, security requirements, system components and security threats. To compute this metric, we estimated the stakes that each stakeholder associates with each security requirement, as well as stochastic matrices that represent the probability of a threat to cause a component failure and the probability of a component failure to cause a security requirement violation. We applied this model to estimate the security of the AMI, by leveraging the recently established National Institute of Standards and Technology Interagency Report (NISTIR) 7628 guidelines for smart grid security and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 63351, Part 9 to identify the life cycle for cryptographic key management, resulting in a vector that assigned to each stakeholder an estimate of their average loss in terms of dollars per day of system operation. To further address probabilities of threats, information security analysis can be performed using game theory implemented in dynamic Agent Based Game Theoretic (ABGT) simulations. Such simulations can be verified with the results from game theory analysis and further used to explore larger scale, real world scenarios involving multiple attackers, defenders, and information assets. The strategy for the game was developed by analyzing five electric sector representative failure scenarios contained in the AMI functional domain from NESCOR WG1. From these five selected scenarios, we characterized them into three specific threat categories affecting confidentiality, integrity and availability (CIA). The analysis using our ABGT simulation demonstrated how to model the AMI functional domain using a set of rationalized game theoretic rules decomposed from the failure scenarios in terms of how those scenarios might impact the AMI network with respect to CIA.« less
  • Results were obtained on residual stresses in the weld of the steel shaft to the Ni-based superalloy turbine wheel for turbochargers. Neutron diffraction studies at the HFIR Residual Stress Facility showed asymmetric tensile stresses after electron-beam welding of the wheel and shaft. A post-weld heat-treatment was found to relieve and reduce the residual stresses. Results were also obtained on cast CF8C-Plus steel as an upgrade alternative to cast irons (SiMo, Ni-resist) for higher temperature capability and performance for the turbocharger housing. CF8C-Plus steel has demonstrated creep-rupture resistance at 600-950oC, and is more creep-resistant than HK30Nb, but lacks oxidation-resistance at 800oCmore » and above in 10% water vapor. New modified CF8C-Plus Cu/W steels with Cr and Ni additions show better oxidation resistance at 800oC in 10% water vapor, and have capability to higher temperatures. For automotive gasoline engine turbocharger applications, higher temperatures are required, so at the end of this project, testing began at 1000oC and above.« less