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Title: Understanding Emerging Impacts and Requirements Related to Utility-Scale Solar Development

Abstract

Utility-scale solar energy plays an important role in the nation’s strategy to address climate change threats through increased deployment of renewable energy technologies, and both the federal government and individual states have established specific goals for increased solar energy development. In order to achieve these goals, much attention is paid to making utility-scale solar energy cost-competitive with other conventional energy sources, while concurrently conducting solar development in an environmentally sound manner.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  2. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1329640
Report Number(s):
ANL/EVS-16/9
130700
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; avian issues; compensatory mitigation; land requirements; long-term; monitoring; utility-scale solar; visual

Citation Formats

Hartmann, Heidi M., Grippo, Mark A., Heath, Garvin A., Macknick, Jordan, Smith, Karen P., Sullivan, Robert G., Walston, Leroy J., and Wescott, Konstance L. Understanding Emerging Impacts and Requirements Related to Utility-Scale Solar Development. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1329640.
Hartmann, Heidi M., Grippo, Mark A., Heath, Garvin A., Macknick, Jordan, Smith, Karen P., Sullivan, Robert G., Walston, Leroy J., & Wescott, Konstance L. Understanding Emerging Impacts and Requirements Related to Utility-Scale Solar Development. United States. doi:10.2172/1329640.
Hartmann, Heidi M., Grippo, Mark A., Heath, Garvin A., Macknick, Jordan, Smith, Karen P., Sullivan, Robert G., Walston, Leroy J., and Wescott, Konstance L. Thu . "Understanding Emerging Impacts and Requirements Related to Utility-Scale Solar Development". United States. doi:10.2172/1329640. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1329640.
@article{osti_1329640,
title = {Understanding Emerging Impacts and Requirements Related to Utility-Scale Solar Development},
author = {Hartmann, Heidi M. and Grippo, Mark A. and Heath, Garvin A. and Macknick, Jordan and Smith, Karen P. and Sullivan, Robert G. and Walston, Leroy J. and Wescott, Konstance L.},
abstractNote = {Utility-scale solar energy plays an important role in the nation’s strategy to address climate change threats through increased deployment of renewable energy technologies, and both the federal government and individual states have established specific goals for increased solar energy development. In order to achieve these goals, much attention is paid to making utility-scale solar energy cost-competitive with other conventional energy sources, while concurrently conducting solar development in an environmentally sound manner.},
doi = {10.2172/1329640},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

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  • In connection with the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM’s) Solar Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Solar PEIS), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) has conducted an extended visual impact analysis for selected key observation points (KOPs) within three National Park Service (NPS) units located within the 25-mi (40-km) viewshed of four solar energy zones (SEZs) identified in the Solar PEIS. The analysis includes only those NPS units that the Solar PEIS identified as potentially subject to moderate or strong visual contrasts associated with solar development within the SEZs. The NPS units included in the analysis are Death Valley and Joshua Tree National Parksmore » and El Camino Real De Tierra Adentro National Historic Trail. The analysis showed that certain KOPs in each of these NPS units could potentially be subject to major visual contrast and impacts from solar development within the SEZs, but many of the KOPs would likely be subject to moderate, minor, or negligible contrasts and impacts, generally because they were relatively distant from the relevant SEZ, had views of the SEZ partially blocked by intervening terrain, and/or had very low vertical angles of view toward the SEZ. For all three NPS units, power tower facilities were found to be major contributors to potential visual contrasts, primarily because of the long-distance visibility of intensely bright reflection of light from the receivers on the central towers, but also because of the height and strong vertical line of the tower structures and the potential for night-sky impacts from FAA-mandated hazard navigation lighting.« less
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