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Title: What Do Owls, Salamanders, Flycatchers and Cuckoos Have In Common?

Abstract

This is an article from the Los Alamos Living magazine. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on a beautiful and unique landscape that provides important protected habitat to many species, including a few that are federally-listed as threatened or endangered. These species are the Jemez Mountains Salamander, the Mexican Spotted Owl, the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher, the Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse. Part of the job of the Laboratory's wildlife biologists is to survey for these species each year and determine what actions need to be taken if they are found.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Wildlife Management
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1329551
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-27407
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Earth Sciences

Citation Formats

Musgrave, Maria A. What Do Owls, Salamanders, Flycatchers and Cuckoos Have In Common?. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1329551.
Musgrave, Maria A. What Do Owls, Salamanders, Flycatchers and Cuckoos Have In Common?. United States. doi:10.2172/1329551.
Musgrave, Maria A. 2016. "What Do Owls, Salamanders, Flycatchers and Cuckoos Have In Common?". United States. doi:10.2172/1329551. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1329551.
@article{osti_1329551,
title = {What Do Owls, Salamanders, Flycatchers and Cuckoos Have In Common?},
author = {Musgrave, Maria A.},
abstractNote = {This is an article from the Los Alamos Living magazine. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on a beautiful and unique landscape that provides important protected habitat to many species, including a few that are federally-listed as threatened or endangered. These species are the Jemez Mountains Salamander, the Mexican Spotted Owl, the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher, the Yellow-billed Cuckoo, and the New Mexico Meadow Jumping Mouse. Part of the job of the Laboratory's wildlife biologists is to survey for these species each year and determine what actions need to be taken if they are found.},
doi = {10.2172/1329551},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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