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Title: QUANTIFYING THE EXPORT OF FLOODPLAIN SOIL CARBON TO ARCTIC RIVERS BY BANK EROSION

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [1];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
  2. Private
  3. University of Pittsburg
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC). Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1329548
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-27398
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Geological Society of America ; 2016-09-25 - 2016-09-28 ; Denver, Colorado, United States
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Earth Sciences

Citation Formats

Rowland, Joel C., Muss, Jordan, Shelef, Eitan, Stauffer, Sophie Jane, and Sutfin, Nicholas Alan. QUANTIFYING THE EXPORT OF FLOODPLAIN SOIL CARBON TO ARCTIC RIVERS BY BANK EROSION. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Rowland, Joel C., Muss, Jordan, Shelef, Eitan, Stauffer, Sophie Jane, & Sutfin, Nicholas Alan. QUANTIFYING THE EXPORT OF FLOODPLAIN SOIL CARBON TO ARCTIC RIVERS BY BANK EROSION. United States.
Rowland, Joel C., Muss, Jordan, Shelef, Eitan, Stauffer, Sophie Jane, and Sutfin, Nicholas Alan. Tue . "QUANTIFYING THE EXPORT OF FLOODPLAIN SOIL CARBON TO ARCTIC RIVERS BY BANK EROSION". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1329548.
@article{osti_1329548,
title = {QUANTIFYING THE EXPORT OF FLOODPLAIN SOIL CARBON TO ARCTIC RIVERS BY BANK EROSION},
author = {Rowland, Joel C. and Muss, Jordan and Shelef, Eitan and Stauffer, Sophie Jane and Sutfin, Nicholas Alan},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Tue Sep 27 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Conference:
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