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Title: Walk the Talk: Progress in Building a Supply Chain Security Culture

Abstract

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has engaged industry to “go beyond compliance” for over a decade in controlling and securing their supply chains to ensure their goods are not diverted to nuclear weapons programs. This work has focused on dual-use industries that manufacture products that can be used in both commercial applications and in the development of a nuclear weapon. The team encourages industry to self-regulate to reduce proliferation risks. As part of that work, PNNL interviewed numerous companies about their compliance practices to understand their business and to build awareness around best practices to ensure security of goods, technology, and information along their supply chains. From conducting this work, PNNL identified indicators that a company can adopt as part of its commitment to nonproliferation ideals with a focus on supply chain security.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1329456
Report Number(s):
PNNL-25740
DN4004030; TRN: US1700374
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; ATTITUDES; SECURITY; INDUSTRY; PROLIFERATION; COMPLIANCE; INFORMATION; DUAL-USE TECHNOLOGIES; Supply Chain Security; Export Control; Center for Global Security Studies; Industry

Citation Formats

Hund, Gretchen. Walk the Talk: Progress in Building a Supply Chain Security Culture. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1329456.
Hund, Gretchen. Walk the Talk: Progress in Building a Supply Chain Security Culture. United States. doi:10.2172/1329456.
Hund, Gretchen. Wed . "Walk the Talk: Progress in Building a Supply Chain Security Culture". United States. doi:10.2172/1329456. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1329456.
@article{osti_1329456,
title = {Walk the Talk: Progress in Building a Supply Chain Security Culture},
author = {Hund, Gretchen},
abstractNote = {Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has engaged industry to “go beyond compliance” for over a decade in controlling and securing their supply chains to ensure their goods are not diverted to nuclear weapons programs. This work has focused on dual-use industries that manufacture products that can be used in both commercial applications and in the development of a nuclear weapon. The team encourages industry to self-regulate to reduce proliferation risks. As part of that work, PNNL interviewed numerous companies about their compliance practices to understand their business and to build awareness around best practices to ensure security of goods, technology, and information along their supply chains. From conducting this work, PNNL identified indicators that a company can adopt as part of its commitment to nonproliferation ideals with a focus on supply chain security.},
doi = {10.2172/1329456},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 31 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Aug 31 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

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