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Title: Engaging Industry in Supporting Self Regulation

Abstract

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Self Regulation team conducted several activities this year to engage industry. This report lists and provides details about those activities.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1329454
Report Number(s):
PNNL-25742
DN4004030
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; Export Control; Industry

Citation Formats

Hund, Gretchen, and Weise, Rachel A. Engaging Industry in Supporting Self Regulation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1329454.
Hund, Gretchen, & Weise, Rachel A. Engaging Industry in Supporting Self Regulation. United States. doi:10.2172/1329454.
Hund, Gretchen, and Weise, Rachel A. 2016. "Engaging Industry in Supporting Self Regulation". United States. doi:10.2172/1329454. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1329454.
@article{osti_1329454,
title = {Engaging Industry in Supporting Self Regulation},
author = {Hund, Gretchen and Weise, Rachel A.},
abstractNote = {The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Self Regulation team conducted several activities this year to engage industry. This report lists and provides details about those activities.},
doi = {10.2172/1329454},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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