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Title: Thermodynamic and Morphological Behavior of Block Copolymer Blends with Thermal Polymer Additives

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
INDUSTRY
OSTI Identifier:
1329413
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Macromolecules; Journal Volume: 49; Journal Issue: 13
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Sunday, Daniel F., Hannon, Adam F., Tein, Summer, and Kline, R. Joseph. Thermodynamic and Morphological Behavior of Block Copolymer Blends with Thermal Polymer Additives. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.macromol.6b00651.
Sunday, Daniel F., Hannon, Adam F., Tein, Summer, & Kline, R. Joseph. Thermodynamic and Morphological Behavior of Block Copolymer Blends with Thermal Polymer Additives. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.macromol.6b00651.
Sunday, Daniel F., Hannon, Adam F., Tein, Summer, and Kline, R. Joseph. 2016. "Thermodynamic and Morphological Behavior of Block Copolymer Blends with Thermal Polymer Additives". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.macromol.6b00651.
@article{osti_1329413,
title = {Thermodynamic and Morphological Behavior of Block Copolymer Blends with Thermal Polymer Additives},
author = {Sunday, Daniel F. and Hannon, Adam F. and Tein, Summer and Kline, R. Joseph},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acs.macromol.6b00651},
journal = {Macromolecules},
number = 13,
volume = 49,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • Recent studies show that compounding polyamide 6 (PA 6) with a PA 6 polyether block copolymers made by reaction injection molding (RIM) or continuous anionic polymerization in a reactive extrusion process (REX) result in blends with high impact strength and high stiffness compared to conventional rubber blends. In this paper, different high impact PA 6 blends were prepared using a twin screw extruder. The different impact modifiers were an ethylene propylene copolymer, a PA PA 6 polyether block copolymer made by reaction injection molding and one made by reactive extrusion. To ensure good particle matrix bonding, the ethylene propylene copolymermore » was grafted with maleic anhydride (EPR-g-MA). Due to the molecular structure of the two block copolymers, a coupling agent was not necessary. The block copolymers are semi-crystalline and partially cross-linked in contrast to commonly used amorphous rubbers which are usually uncured. The combination of different analysis methods like atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) gave a detailed view in the structure of the blends. Due to the partial cross-linking, the particles of the block copolymers in the blends are not spherical like the ones of ethylene propylene copolymer. The differences in molecular structure, miscibility and grafting of the impact modifiers result in different mechanical properties and different blend morphologies.« less
  • The effect of block copolymers on the cocontinuous morphology of 50/50 (w/w) polystyrene (PS)/high density polyethylene (HDPE) blends was investigated using symmetric polystyrene-polyethylene block copolymers (PS-PE) with molecular weights varying from 6 to 200 kg/mol. The coarsening rate during annealing was compared to the Doi-Ohta theory. An intermediate molecular weight PS-PE, 40 kg/mol, showed remarkable results in reducing the phase size and stabilizing the blend morphology during annealing. Mixing small amounts of 6, 100 or 200 kg/mol PS-PE in the blend did not reduce the phase size significantly, but did decrease the coarsening rate during annealing. In stabilizing the morphology,more » 6 kg/mol PS-PE was inferior to 100 and 200 kg/mol. The existence of an optimal molecular weight block copolymer is due to a balance between the ability of the block copolymer to reach the interface and its relative stabilization effect at the interface.« less
  • The amorphous phase behavior of blends of poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT) and poly(ester-ether) segmented block copolymers (PEE) was found to vary from completely immiscible to miscible, depending on the copolymer composition. The predictions of the Flory-Huggins relationship are in general agreement with the observed behavior when the interaction parameters are estimated from solubility parameters. The results of thermal analysis and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments strongly suggest that the PBT and PEE copolymers are capable of cocrystallization in the miscible blends under all crystallization conditions. The cocrystalline microstructure results from the complete miscibility and the blocky nature of the copolymer (i.e., themore » identical chemical and crystalline structures of the PEE hard segments and PBT). The crystallization rate of the copolymer in the miscible blends was found to be significantly enhanced due to the presence of PBT, and the resulting crystal thickness was found to be the same as that observed for PBT. Partially miscible blends of PBT with copolymers containing intermediate hard-segment concentrations formed distinguishable crystal populations, but the crystallization rate of the copolymer in these blends was also strongly influenced by the presence of PBT.« less