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Title: Annual Energy Outlook 2016 With Projections to 2040

Abstract

The Annual Energy Outlook 2016 (AEO2016), prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2040. The projections, focused on U.S. energy markets, are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS enables EIA to make projections under alternative, internallyconsistent sets of assumptions. The analysis in AEO2016 focuses on the Reference case and 17 alternative cases. EIA published an Early Release version of the AEO2016 Reference case (including U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Power Plan (CPP)) and a No CPP case (excluding the CPP) in May 2016.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Energy Information Administration (EI), Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy Analysis
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Office of Energy Analysis (EI-30)
OSTI Identifier:
1329373
Report Number(s):
DOE/EIA-0383(2016)
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY

Citation Formats

None, None. Annual Energy Outlook 2016 With Projections to 2040. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1329373.
None, None. Annual Energy Outlook 2016 With Projections to 2040. United States. doi:10.2172/1329373.
None, None. 2016. "Annual Energy Outlook 2016 With Projections to 2040". United States. doi:10.2172/1329373. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1329373.
@article{osti_1329373,
title = {Annual Energy Outlook 2016 With Projections to 2040},
author = {None, None},
abstractNote = {The Annual Energy Outlook 2016 (AEO2016), prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), presents long-term projections of energy supply, demand, and prices through 2040. The projections, focused on U.S. energy markets, are based on results from EIA’s National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). NEMS enables EIA to make projections under alternative, internallyconsistent sets of assumptions. The analysis in AEO2016 focuses on the Reference case and 17 alternative cases. EIA published an Early Release version of the AEO2016 Reference case (including U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Power Plan (CPP)) and a No CPP case (excluding the CPP) in May 2016.},
doi = {10.2172/1329373},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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