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Title: Development and Demonstration of a Magnesium-Intensive Vehicle Front-End Substructure

Abstract

This project is the final phase (designated Phase III) of an extensive, nine-year effort with the objectives of developing a knowledge base and enabling technologies for the design, fabrication and performance evaluation of magnesium-intensive automotive front-end substructures intended to partially or completely replace all-steel comparators, providing a weight savings approaching 50% of the baseline. Benefits of extensive vehicle weight reduction in terms of fuel economy increase, extended vehicle range, vehicle performance and commensurate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are well known. An exemplary vehicle substructure considered by the project is illustrated in Figure 1, along with the exterior vehicle appearance. This unibody front-end “substructure” is one physical objective of the ultimate design and engineering aspects established at the outset of the larger collective effort.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC, Southfield, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
United States Automotive Materials Partnership LLC, Southfield, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1329010
DOE Contract Number:
EE0005660
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS

Citation Formats

Logan, Stephen D., Forsmark, Joy H., and Osborne, Richard. Development and Demonstration of a Magnesium-Intensive Vehicle Front-End Substructure. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1329010.
Logan, Stephen D., Forsmark, Joy H., & Osborne, Richard. Development and Demonstration of a Magnesium-Intensive Vehicle Front-End Substructure. United States. doi:10.2172/1329010.
Logan, Stephen D., Forsmark, Joy H., and Osborne, Richard. Fri . "Development and Demonstration of a Magnesium-Intensive Vehicle Front-End Substructure". United States. doi:10.2172/1329010. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1329010.
@article{osti_1329010,
title = {Development and Demonstration of a Magnesium-Intensive Vehicle Front-End Substructure},
author = {Logan, Stephen D. and Forsmark, Joy H. and Osborne, Richard},
abstractNote = {This project is the final phase (designated Phase III) of an extensive, nine-year effort with the objectives of developing a knowledge base and enabling technologies for the design, fabrication and performance evaluation of magnesium-intensive automotive front-end substructures intended to partially or completely replace all-steel comparators, providing a weight savings approaching 50% of the baseline. Benefits of extensive vehicle weight reduction in terms of fuel economy increase, extended vehicle range, vehicle performance and commensurate reductions in greenhouse gas emissions are well known. An exemplary vehicle substructure considered by the project is illustrated in Figure 1, along with the exterior vehicle appearance. This unibody front-end “substructure” is one physical objective of the ultimate design and engineering aspects established at the outset of the larger collective effort.},
doi = {10.2172/1329010},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

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