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Title: Preliminary measurements of the edge magnetic field pitch from 2-D Doppler backscattering in MAST and NSTX-U (invited)

Abstract

The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) system is a novel diagnostic consisting of an array of 8 independently phased antennas. At any one time, SAMI operates at one of the 16 frequencies in the range 10-34.5 GHz. The imaging beam is steered in software post-shot to create a picture of the entire emission surface. In SAMI’s active probing mode of operation, the plasma edge is illuminated with a monochromatic source and SAMI reconstructs an image of the Doppler back-scattered (DBS) signal. By assuming that density fluctuations are extended along magnetic field lines, and knowing that the strongest back-scattered signals are directed perpendicular to the density fluctuations, SAMI’s 2-D DBS imaging capability can be used to measure the pitch of the edge magnetic field. In this paper, we present preliminary pitch angle measurements obtained by SAMI on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) at Culham Centre for Fusion Energy and on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Lastly, the results demonstrate encouraging agreement between SAMI and other independent measurements.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4]
  1. Univ. of York, York (United Kingdom)
  2. Durham Univ., Durham (United Kingdom)
  3. Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)
  4. Univ. of York, York (United Kingdom); Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom). Culhma Centre for Fusion Energy
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1328862
Report Number(s):
5263
Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748; RSINAK; TRN: US1601853
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-09CH11466
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 11; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; antennas; Doppler effect; H mode; current density; plasma diagnostics

Citation Formats

Vann, R. G. L., Brunner, K. J., Ellis, R., Taylor, G., and Thomas, D. A.. Preliminary measurements of the edge magnetic field pitch from 2-D Doppler backscattering in MAST and NSTX-U (invited). United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4962253.
Vann, R. G. L., Brunner, K. J., Ellis, R., Taylor, G., & Thomas, D. A.. Preliminary measurements of the edge magnetic field pitch from 2-D Doppler backscattering in MAST and NSTX-U (invited). United States. doi:10.1063/1.4962253.
Vann, R. G. L., Brunner, K. J., Ellis, R., Taylor, G., and Thomas, D. A.. 2016. "Preliminary measurements of the edge magnetic field pitch from 2-D Doppler backscattering in MAST and NSTX-U (invited)". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4962253. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1328862.
@article{osti_1328862,
title = {Preliminary measurements of the edge magnetic field pitch from 2-D Doppler backscattering in MAST and NSTX-U (invited)},
author = {Vann, R. G. L. and Brunner, K. J. and Ellis, R. and Taylor, G. and Thomas, D. A.},
abstractNote = {The Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging (SAMI) system is a novel diagnostic consisting of an array of 8 independently phased antennas. At any one time, SAMI operates at one of the 16 frequencies in the range 10-34.5 GHz. The imaging beam is steered in software post-shot to create a picture of the entire emission surface. In SAMI’s active probing mode of operation, the plasma edge is illuminated with a monochromatic source and SAMI reconstructs an image of the Doppler back-scattered (DBS) signal. By assuming that density fluctuations are extended along magnetic field lines, and knowing that the strongest back-scattered signals are directed perpendicular to the density fluctuations, SAMI’s 2-D DBS imaging capability can be used to measure the pitch of the edge magnetic field. In this paper, we present preliminary pitch angle measurements obtained by SAMI on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST) at Culham Centre for Fusion Energy and on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Lastly, the results demonstrate encouraging agreement between SAMI and other independent measurements.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4962253},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 11,
volume = 87,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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