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Title: Pyrolysis of ground pine chip and ground pellet particles

Abstract

In addition to particle size, biomass density influences heat and mass transfer rates during the thermal treatment processes. In this research, thermal behaviour of ground pine chip particles and ground pine pellet particles in the range of 0.25–5 mm was investigated. A single particle from ground pellets was almost 3 to 4 times denser than a single particle from ground chips at a similar size and volume of particle. Temperature was ramped up from room temperature (~25 °C) to 600 °C with heating rates of 10, 20, 30, and 50 °C/min. Pellet particles took 25–88 % longer time to dry than the chip particles. Microscopic examination of 3 mm and larger chip particles showed cracks during drying. No cracks were observed for pellet particles. The mass loss due to treatment at temperatures higher than 200 °C was about 80% both for chip and pellet particles. It took 4 min for chip and pellet particles to lose roughly 63% of their dry mass at a heating rate of 50 °C/min. The SEM structural analysis showed enlarged pores and cracks in cell walls of the pyrolyzed wood chips. As a result, these pores were not observed in pyrolyzed pellet particles.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)
  2. Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1328339
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 94; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0008-4034
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 42 ENGINEERING; drying; pyrolysis; heating rate; particle size; chips; pellet; pine

Citation Formats

Rezaei, Hamid, Yazdanpanah, Fahimeh, Lim, C. Jim, Lau, Anthony, and Sokhansanj, Shahab. Pyrolysis of ground pine chip and ground pellet particles. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1002/cjce.22574.
Rezaei, Hamid, Yazdanpanah, Fahimeh, Lim, C. Jim, Lau, Anthony, & Sokhansanj, Shahab. Pyrolysis of ground pine chip and ground pellet particles. United States. doi:10.1002/cjce.22574.
Rezaei, Hamid, Yazdanpanah, Fahimeh, Lim, C. Jim, Lau, Anthony, and Sokhansanj, Shahab. 2016. "Pyrolysis of ground pine chip and ground pellet particles". United States. doi:10.1002/cjce.22574. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1328339.
@article{osti_1328339,
title = {Pyrolysis of ground pine chip and ground pellet particles},
author = {Rezaei, Hamid and Yazdanpanah, Fahimeh and Lim, C. Jim and Lau, Anthony and Sokhansanj, Shahab},
abstractNote = {In addition to particle size, biomass density influences heat and mass transfer rates during the thermal treatment processes. In this research, thermal behaviour of ground pine chip particles and ground pine pellet particles in the range of 0.25–5 mm was investigated. A single particle from ground pellets was almost 3 to 4 times denser than a single particle from ground chips at a similar size and volume of particle. Temperature was ramped up from room temperature (~25 °C) to 600 °C with heating rates of 10, 20, 30, and 50 °C/min. Pellet particles took 25–88 % longer time to dry than the chip particles. Microscopic examination of 3 mm and larger chip particles showed cracks during drying. No cracks were observed for pellet particles. The mass loss due to treatment at temperatures higher than 200 °C was about 80% both for chip and pellet particles. It took 4 min for chip and pellet particles to lose roughly 63% of their dry mass at a heating rate of 50 °C/min. The SEM structural analysis showed enlarged pores and cracks in cell walls of the pyrolyzed wood chips. As a result, these pores were not observed in pyrolyzed pellet particles.},
doi = {10.1002/cjce.22574},
journal = {Canadian Journal of Chemical Engineering},
number = 10,
volume = 94,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
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