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Title: Great Lakes O shore Wind Project: Utility and Regional Integration Study

Abstract

This project aims to identify transmission system upgrades needed to facilitate offshore wind projects as well as operational impacts of offshore generation on operation of the regional transmission system in the Great Lakes region. A simulation model of the US Eastern Interconnection was used as the test system as a case study for investigating the impact of the integration of a 1000MW offshore wind farm operating in Lake Erie into FirstEnergy/PJM service territory. The findings of this research provide recommendations on offshore wind integration scenarios, the locations of points of interconnection, wind profile modeling and simulation, and computational methods to quantify performance, along with operating changes and equipment upgrades needed to mitigate system performance issues introduced by an offshore wind project.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)
  2. General Electric (GE), Albany, NY (United States)
  3. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  4. FirstEnergy, Akron, OH (United States)
  5. PJM Interconnection, Audubon, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
Contributing Org.:
General Electric (GE), Albany, NY (United States); National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); FirstEnergy, Akron, OH (United States); PJM Interconnection, Audubon, PA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
1328159
Report Number(s):
DOE-CWRU-DE-EE0005367
DOE Contract Number:
EE0005367
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY

Citation Formats

Sajadi, Amirhossein, Loparo, Kenneth A., D'Aquila, Robert, Clark, Kara, Waligorski, Joseph G., and Baker, Scott. Great Lakes O shore Wind Project: Utility and Regional Integration Study. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1328159.
Sajadi, Amirhossein, Loparo, Kenneth A., D'Aquila, Robert, Clark, Kara, Waligorski, Joseph G., & Baker, Scott. Great Lakes O shore Wind Project: Utility and Regional Integration Study. United States. doi:10.2172/1328159.
Sajadi, Amirhossein, Loparo, Kenneth A., D'Aquila, Robert, Clark, Kara, Waligorski, Joseph G., and Baker, Scott. Thu . "Great Lakes O shore Wind Project: Utility and Regional Integration Study". United States. doi:10.2172/1328159. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1328159.
@article{osti_1328159,
title = {Great Lakes O shore Wind Project: Utility and Regional Integration Study},
author = {Sajadi, Amirhossein and Loparo, Kenneth A. and D'Aquila, Robert and Clark, Kara and Waligorski, Joseph G. and Baker, Scott},
abstractNote = {This project aims to identify transmission system upgrades needed to facilitate offshore wind projects as well as operational impacts of offshore generation on operation of the regional transmission system in the Great Lakes region. A simulation model of the US Eastern Interconnection was used as the test system as a case study for investigating the impact of the integration of a 1000MW offshore wind farm operating in Lake Erie into FirstEnergy/PJM service territory. The findings of this research provide recommendations on offshore wind integration scenarios, the locations of points of interconnection, wind profile modeling and simulation, and computational methods to quantify performance, along with operating changes and equipment upgrades needed to mitigate system performance issues introduced by an offshore wind project.},
doi = {10.2172/1328159},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 30 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Thu Jun 30 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Technical Report:

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