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Title: Induced Polarization Signature of Biofilms in Porous Media: From Laboratory Experiments to Theoretical Developments and Validation

Abstract

Bioremediation strategies for mitigating the transport of heavy metals and radionuclides in subsurface sediments have largely targeted the use of dissimilatory metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Growth and metabolic activities from these organisms can significantly influence biogeochemical processes, including mineral dissolution/precipitation, fluctuating pH and redox potential (Eh) values, development of biofilms, and decreasing hydraulic conductivity. The Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) technique has emerged as the technique most sensitive to the presence of microbial cells and biofilms in porous media; yet it is often difficult to unambiguously distinguish the impact of multiple and often competing processes that occur during in-situ biostimulation activities on the SIP signatures. The main goal of our project is to quantitatively characterize major components within bacterial biofilms (cells, DNA, metals, metabolites etc.) contributing to detectable SIP signatures. We specifically: (i) evaluated the contribution of biofilm components to SIP signatures, (ii) determined the contribution of biogenic minerals commonly found in biofilms to SIP signatures, (iii) determined if the SIP signatures can be used to quantify the rates of biofilm formation, (iv) developed models and a fundamental understanding of potential underlying polarization mechanisms at low frequencies (<40 kHz) resulting from the presence of microbial cells and biofilms

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)
  2. Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1327843
Report Number(s):
DOE-Okstate-SC0007118
5736472579
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0007118
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: PublicationsAbdel Aal, G.Z., E.A. Atekwana, and A. Revil, Geophysical signatures of disseminated iron minerals: A proxy for understanding subsurface biophysicochemical processes, Journal of Geophysical Research-Biogeosciences, 119(9), 1831-1849, doi: 10.1002/2014JG002659, 2014.Mao D. and A. Revil, Induced polarization response of porous media with metallic particles. – Part 3. A new approach to time-domain induced polarization tomography, in press Geophysics, 2016a.Mao D. A. Revil, and J. Hinton, Induced polarization response of porous media with metallic particles. – Part 4. Detection of metallic and non-metallic targets in time domain induced polarization tomography, Geophysics, 81(4), D345-D361, doi: 10.1190/geo2015-0480.1, 2016b.Revil, A., E. A. Atekwana, C. Zhang, A. Jardani, and S. Smith (2012), A new model for the spectral induced polarization signature of bacterial growth in porous media, Water Resour. Res., 48, W09545, doi:10.1029/2012WR011965.Revil, A., E. Atekwana, C. Zhang, A. Jardani, and S. Smith, A new model for the spectral induced polarization signature of bacterial growth in porous media, Water Resour. Res., 48, W09545, doi:10.1029/2012WR011965, 2012.Revil A., N. Florsch, and D. Mao, Induced polarization response of porous media with metallic particles — Part 1: A theory for disseminated semiconductors, Geophysics, 80(5), D525–D538, doi: 10.1190/GEO2014-0577.1, 2015a.Revil A., G. Z. Abdel Aal, E.A. Atekwana, D. Mao, and N. Florsch, Induced polarization response of porous media with metallic particles — Part 2. Comparison with a broad database of experimental data, Geophysics, 80(5), D539-D552, doi: 10.1190/GEO2014-0578.1, 2015b.Zhang, C., A. Revil, Y. Fujita, J. Munakata-Marr, and G. Redden, Quadrature conductivity: a quantitative indicator of bacteria abundance in porous media, Geophysics, 79(6), D363–D375, doi: 10.1190/GEO2014-0107.1, 2014.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; Biofilms; geophysics; induced polarization

Citation Formats

Atekwana, Estella, Patrauchan, Marianna, and Revil, Andre. Induced Polarization Signature of Biofilms in Porous Media: From Laboratory Experiments to Theoretical Developments and Validation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1327843.
Atekwana, Estella, Patrauchan, Marianna, & Revil, Andre. Induced Polarization Signature of Biofilms in Porous Media: From Laboratory Experiments to Theoretical Developments and Validation. United States. doi:10.2172/1327843.
Atekwana, Estella, Patrauchan, Marianna, and Revil, Andre. Tue . "Induced Polarization Signature of Biofilms in Porous Media: From Laboratory Experiments to Theoretical Developments and Validation". United States. doi:10.2172/1327843. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1327843.
@article{osti_1327843,
title = {Induced Polarization Signature of Biofilms in Porous Media: From Laboratory Experiments to Theoretical Developments and Validation},
author = {Atekwana, Estella and Patrauchan, Marianna and Revil, Andre},
abstractNote = {Bioremediation strategies for mitigating the transport of heavy metals and radionuclides in subsurface sediments have largely targeted the use of dissimilatory metal and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Growth and metabolic activities from these organisms can significantly influence biogeochemical processes, including mineral dissolution/precipitation, fluctuating pH and redox potential (Eh) values, development of biofilms, and decreasing hydraulic conductivity. The Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) technique has emerged as the technique most sensitive to the presence of microbial cells and biofilms in porous media; yet it is often difficult to unambiguously distinguish the impact of multiple and often competing processes that occur during in-situ biostimulation activities on the SIP signatures. The main goal of our project is to quantitatively characterize major components within bacterial biofilms (cells, DNA, metals, metabolites etc.) contributing to detectable SIP signatures. We specifically: (i) evaluated the contribution of biofilm components to SIP signatures, (ii) determined the contribution of biogenic minerals commonly found in biofilms to SIP signatures, (iii) determined if the SIP signatures can be used to quantify the rates of biofilm formation, (iv) developed models and a fundamental understanding of potential underlying polarization mechanisms at low frequencies (<40 kHz) resulting from the presence of microbial cells and biofilms},
doi = {10.2172/1327843},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {10}
}