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Title: Strain and bioprocess improvement of a thermophilic anaerobe for the production of ethanol from wood

Abstract

Here, the thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum digests hemicellulose and utilizes the major sugars present in biomass. It was previously engineered to produce ethanol at yields equivalent to yeast. While saccharolytic anaerobes have been long studied as potential biomass-fermenting organisms, development efforts for commercial ethanol production have not been reported.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [4];  [4];  [4];  [8];  [9];  [9];  [9];  [10];  [11]
  1. Mascoma Corp., Lebanon, NH (United States); Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)
  2. Mascoma Corp., Lebanon, NH (United States); Verdezyne, Carlsbad, CA (United States)
  3. Mascoma Corp., Lebanon, NH (United States); Novogy, Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)
  4. Mascoma Corp., Lebanon, NH (United States)
  5. Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Bioenergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  6. Mascoma Corp., Lebanon, NH (United States); Genzyme, Cambridge, MA (United States)
  7. Mascoma Corp., Lebanon, NH (United States); Myriant Corp., Quincy, MA (United States)
  8. Mascoma Corp., Lebanon, NH (United States); Nalco Champion, Houston, TX (United States)
  9. Bioenergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  10. Mascoma Corp., Lebanon, NH (United States); Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States); Bioenergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  11. Mascoma Corp., Lebanon, NH (United States); Novozymes, Inc., Davis, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). BioEnergy Science Center (BESC)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1327705
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Biotechnology for Biofuels
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1754-6834
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; cellulosic ethanol; consolidated bioprocessing; organism development; metabolic engineering; bioprocess development; Thermophilic bacteria

Citation Formats

Herring, Christopher D., Kenealy, William R., Shaw, A. Joe, Covalla, Sean F., Olson, Daniel G., Zhang, Jiayi, Sillers, W. Ryan, Tsakraklides, Vasiliki, Bardsley, John S., Rogers, Stephen R., Thorne, Philip G., Johnson, Jessica P., Foster, Abigail, Shikhare, Indraneel D., Klingeman, Dawn M., Brown, Steven D., Davison, Brian H., Lynd, Lee R., and Hogsett, David A. Strain and bioprocess improvement of a thermophilic anaerobe for the production of ethanol from wood. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1186/s13068-016-0536-8.
Herring, Christopher D., Kenealy, William R., Shaw, A. Joe, Covalla, Sean F., Olson, Daniel G., Zhang, Jiayi, Sillers, W. Ryan, Tsakraklides, Vasiliki, Bardsley, John S., Rogers, Stephen R., Thorne, Philip G., Johnson, Jessica P., Foster, Abigail, Shikhare, Indraneel D., Klingeman, Dawn M., Brown, Steven D., Davison, Brian H., Lynd, Lee R., & Hogsett, David A. Strain and bioprocess improvement of a thermophilic anaerobe for the production of ethanol from wood. United States. doi:10.1186/s13068-016-0536-8.
Herring, Christopher D., Kenealy, William R., Shaw, A. Joe, Covalla, Sean F., Olson, Daniel G., Zhang, Jiayi, Sillers, W. Ryan, Tsakraklides, Vasiliki, Bardsley, John S., Rogers, Stephen R., Thorne, Philip G., Johnson, Jessica P., Foster, Abigail, Shikhare, Indraneel D., Klingeman, Dawn M., Brown, Steven D., Davison, Brian H., Lynd, Lee R., and Hogsett, David A. 2016. "Strain and bioprocess improvement of a thermophilic anaerobe for the production of ethanol from wood". United States. doi:10.1186/s13068-016-0536-8. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1327705.
@article{osti_1327705,
title = {Strain and bioprocess improvement of a thermophilic anaerobe for the production of ethanol from wood},
author = {Herring, Christopher D. and Kenealy, William R. and Shaw, A. Joe and Covalla, Sean F. and Olson, Daniel G. and Zhang, Jiayi and Sillers, W. Ryan and Tsakraklides, Vasiliki and Bardsley, John S. and Rogers, Stephen R. and Thorne, Philip G. and Johnson, Jessica P. and Foster, Abigail and Shikhare, Indraneel D. and Klingeman, Dawn M. and Brown, Steven D. and Davison, Brian H. and Lynd, Lee R. and Hogsett, David A.},
abstractNote = {Here, the thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum digests hemicellulose and utilizes the major sugars present in biomass. It was previously engineered to produce ethanol at yields equivalent to yeast. While saccharolytic anaerobes have been long studied as potential biomass-fermenting organisms, development efforts for commercial ethanol production have not been reported.},
doi = {10.1186/s13068-016-0536-8},
journal = {Biotechnology for Biofuels},
number = 1,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 3works
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  • Several thermophilic and extreme thermophilic anaerobic bacteria can utilize hemicellulose (xylan polymer) from birch- and beechwood directly. Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus JW200 exhibited the highest ethanol formation, although the extracellular xylanase and xylosidase activities were very low. All bacteria rapidly utilized xylose before the polymers were utilized at a lower rate. With resting cell suspensions of T. ethanolicus and its mutants, the ethanol formation rates were as high as 60 mmol (2.76 g) and 30 mmol (1.3 g) ethanol per L per h from glucose and xylose, respectively. After 1 hr the ethanol productions in the concentrated cell suspensions were linear formore » over 10 h from glucose of xylose; however, with soluble starch (DE 10) the rates were increasing with time.From these experiments it is concluded that the continuous culture experiments with hemicellulosic material and/or starch have to be performed with recycling of the cells and the extracellular enzymes.« less
  • Geobacillus sp. WCH70 was one of several thermophilic organisms isolated from hot composts in the Middleton, WI area. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences showed the strain may be a new species, and is most closely related to G. galactosidasius and G. toebii. The genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute and deposited at the NCBI in December 2009 (CP001638). The genome of Geobacillus species WCH70 consists of one circular chromosome of 3,893,306 bp with an average G + C content of 43 %, and two circular plasmids of 33,899 and 10,287 bp with anmore » average G + C content of 40 %. Among sequenced organisms, Geobacillus sp. WCH70 shares highest Average Nucleotide Identity (86 %) with G. thermoglucosidasius strains, as well as similar genome organization. Geobacillus sp. WCH70 appears to be a highly adaptable organism, with an exceptionally high 125 annotated transposons in the genome. The organism also possesses four predicted restriction-modification systems not found in other Geobacillus species.« less
  • Both hard (mostly oak) and soft (pine and fir) wood sawdust were fermented by mixed cultures of anaerobic bacteria with concomitant methane production. A greater lag in methane production occurred with soft than with hard wood. Arabinose, rhamnose, and xylose stimulated mixed culture methanogenesis in the presence of added methane precursors (acetate, formate, CO2 and H2). Xylose retarded methane production in pure cultures of Methanobacterium formicicum. Alcoholic extracts of both woods inhibited methane production, and the greater amounts of these in coniferous wood may explain the lag.
  • Mixed cultures of anaerobic bacteria fermented both coniferous and deciduous wood sawdust concomitant CH4 production. A consistently greater lag in methanogenesis was observed on coniferous than on deciduous wood. Arabinose, glucose, galactose, mannose, rhamnose, and xylose when added to enrichment cultures had either no effect or a slight stimulation of CH4 production in the absence of added CH4 precursors (AcO-HCO2-, CO2, and H). In the presence of added precursors arabinose, rhamnose, and xylose stimulated mixed culture methanogenesis, but xylose retarded methanogenesis in pure cultures of Methanobacterium formicicum. Alcohol extracts of either deciduous or coniferous wood were inhibitory to methanogenesis frommore » either mixed cultures or from M. formicicum.« less
  • During and a few years after the Second World War, an important chemical industry was built up in Sweden based on wood as raw material together with sodium chloride and electric power. An astonishingly large variety of simple chemical products was produced, many of them vital to the Swedish society. The main intermediary product was ethanol obtained from sulfite waste liquor through fermentation. Glycol products were made via ethylene and ethylene oxide. Oxidation to acetaldehyde, followed by aldol condensation, and to acetic acid gave products such as butanol, butyl acetate and octanol. The manufacture of a cellulose ether, ethyl-hydroxyethyl cellulosemore » provides a good example of a well integrated system. (auth)« less