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Title: Fast oxygen diffusion in bismuth oxide probed by quasielastic neutron scattering

Abstract

In this paper, we present the first, to our knowledge, study of solid state oxygen translational diffusion by quasielastic neutron scattering. Such studies in the past might have been precluded by relatively low diffusivities of oxygen anions in the temperature range amenable to neutron scattering experiments. To explore the potential of the quasielastic scattering technique, which can deduce atomic diffusion jump length of oxygen anions through the momentum transfer dependence of the scattering signal, we have selected the fastest known oxygen conductor, bismuth oxide. Finally, we have found the oxygen anion jump length in excellent agreement with the nearest oxygen-vacancy distance in the anion sublattice of the fluorite-related structure of bismuth oxide.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Neutron Sciences Directorate. Chemical and Engineering Materials Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1327676
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Solid State Ionics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 296; Journal ID: ISSN 0167-2738
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; Oxygen diffusion; Quasielastic neutron scattering

Citation Formats

Mamontov, Eugene. Fast oxygen diffusion in bismuth oxide probed by quasielastic neutron scattering. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ssi.2016.09.022.
Mamontov, Eugene. Fast oxygen diffusion in bismuth oxide probed by quasielastic neutron scattering. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ssi.2016.09.022.
Mamontov, Eugene. 2016. "Fast oxygen diffusion in bismuth oxide probed by quasielastic neutron scattering". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ssi.2016.09.022. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1327676.
@article{osti_1327676,
title = {Fast oxygen diffusion in bismuth oxide probed by quasielastic neutron scattering},
author = {Mamontov, Eugene},
abstractNote = {In this paper, we present the first, to our knowledge, study of solid state oxygen translational diffusion by quasielastic neutron scattering. Such studies in the past might have been precluded by relatively low diffusivities of oxygen anions in the temperature range amenable to neutron scattering experiments. To explore the potential of the quasielastic scattering technique, which can deduce atomic diffusion jump length of oxygen anions through the momentum transfer dependence of the scattering signal, we have selected the fastest known oxygen conductor, bismuth oxide. Finally, we have found the oxygen anion jump length in excellent agreement with the nearest oxygen-vacancy distance in the anion sublattice of the fluorite-related structure of bismuth oxide.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ssi.2016.09.022},
journal = {Solid State Ionics},
number = ,
volume = 296,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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